Sep
30
2011
Project Image
Project Details

I have been so excited to share this project with you guys... and even more excited to check it off the list of 'things that needed to be done' around my home! I love the non-traditional use for this piece I have given it by placing it in my kitchen nook! But what a fabulous place for it! This is a duplicate of the Base Unit (found here) in my office, only this one has a hutch!

The Deets

You can see that I haven't quite finished decorating them. I was just too excited to wait to share these with you!

If you are interested in browsing the other articles that show bits and pieces of my home, visit the Home Tour page found under the Living tab in my menu or click here.

Showcase: Built From These PlansI am so honored each and every time one of you fine friends builds from these very plans! If you have built this piece, please take a moment and showcase your build! We are dying to see your fabulous hard work!

Estimated Cost

$25-$50

Tools

Tape Measure

Drill

Kreg Jig - optional can use countersink bit and screws

Miter Saw - optional for trim

Nail Gun - optional and can use hammer/finish nail set

Lumber

3 - 1x2 at 8'

1 - 1x2 at 6'

2 - 1x12 at 8'

1 - 1x12 at 6'

6 to 7' of 2" Crown Molding Trim in a style of your choice.

Materials

2" Finish Nails

1 1/4" pocket hole screws OR wood screws (depending on whether you are using a kreg jig or not).

Wood Glue

Wood Filler

Safety Gear

Sanding Supplies

Finishing Supplies

Cut List

2 - 1x2 at 46 1/2" Cleats

3 - 1x2 at 45" Face Frame Trim

2 - 1x2 at 42" Face Frame Trim

3 - 1x12 at 46 1/2" Shelves

2 - 1x12 at 42" Sides

1 - Crown Molding at 50-52"

2 - Crown Molding at 13-15"

Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials!

Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices.

Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1

Attach the Shelves to the Sides: Use your Kreg Jig set for 3/4" stock and your 1 1/4" pocket hole screws and glue or countersink for your 2" wood screws.

Step 1
Step 2

Attach the Face Frame Trim: Use 2" finish nails and glue.

Step 2
Step 3

Attach the Cleats: Use your Kreg Jig set for 3/4" stock and your 1 1/4" pocket hole screws and glue or countersink and use 2" wood screws.

Step 3
Step 4

Fasten the Molding in place: Miter the front corners of your molding at 45 degrees and secure to the top of your unit using 2" finish nails and glue.

**The exact measurements will be determined by the style and size of the molding you choose so be sure to mark/measure for your exact piece!

Step 4
Step 4
Step 11

I'm linking this fine project up here and to Get your Craft on Tuesday

Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

Note

If you enjoyed this post, comment below, Share it or Like it, and subscribe to my feed to stay up to date!

You can now also:

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Living 
Disclaimer

**Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you provide an adequate link back to the appropriate post! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it.

Sep
30
2011
Project Image

I think many of you have seen the amazing work my girl Loren does...she not only builds, but contributes amazing plans for all of us to build from! She's a design/build extraordinaire! This project is no exception! Not only did she build it, she contributed the plans for it! Could you just D.I.E? yep...me too!

Estimated Cost 

$50-$75

Sep
29
2011
Project Image

This fun and quick little number was like the little engine that could... every time I hit a road block, aka DIY disaster, this project just kept on moving forward until I finally had a finished product I loved!

For the full tutorial, click here, and head on over to The DIY Club to visit with me while I share my project in all it's crazy glory with you!

The DIY Club 
Sep
28
2011
Project Image

I'm fairly certain I say this often...but you guys are gonna D.I.E. when you see what Carrie did! Yep you are going to pass right out! Yahoo.

Length of Time 

Carrie had these plans for well over a year before she actually began building. Once the building began it was only a matter of a few weekends before she had this amazing yard full of fabulous furniture!

Finishing Technique 

SW’s solid deck stain in Lodge Brown

Additional Project Details 

Carrie actually built these from plans she found through Lowe's Creative Ideas, but they are so similar to our Chesapeake Collection that it's worth sharing and noting her suggestions (buy the wheels or be sure to add them, since this baby is HEAVY!).

Sep
27
2011
Project Image
Project Details

Another project I have been working on is a low set of shelves for my Office Craft Space! Ultimately all of the shelving will match in style, but for now, this shelf has a decidedly traditional sense about it!

Personally, nothing gets me going more than traditional shelving can! yahoo...

This build is really simple and can be modified to taste or tools available! Easy peasy...

The Deets

Aside from the obvious storage of books... this friend serves as tv storage and reference library for TDC headquarters! That's right, design and drafting books galore, right next to some of the classics and a rare book collection or two... Everything in a small home has got to serve multiple purposes and this is no exception.

I could have gone taller with this shelf. But after building this shelf here, for my craft and design supplies which is about 7' high, having another set of shelves that are equally tall in the same space is likely to make this teeny tiny room feel claustrophobic and not so comforting to work in.

As soon as I fully decide on any additional shelves for my Craft Space shelving, I will be trimming out the unit in similar fashion to this low shelf here!

Showcase: Built From These PlansI am so honored each and every time one of you fine friends builds from these very plans! If you have built this piece, please take a moment and showcase your build! We are dying to see your fabulous hard work!

Estimated Cost

$25-$50

Tools

Tape Measure

Drill

Sander

Miter Saw - if you plan on adding molding or trim at the top.

Kreg Jig - optional but will make your connections stronger and more professional

Nail Gun - optional and can use hammer and nail set.

Lumber

1 sheet of 3/4" Ply

2 - 1x2 at 8'

1 - 1x2 at 6'

7' - 8' of small trim or molding in a style of your choice. The amount you need will depend on the size of the molding. For smaller trim, you will need closer to 7' and this will increase with an increase in the size of the trim itself.

Materials

1 1/4" Wood Screws or Pocket Hole Screws

1 1/4" Finish Nails

Wood Filler

Wood Glue

Sanding Supplies

Finishing Supplies

Cut List

2 - 3/4" Ply at 29 1/2" Sides

1 - 3/4" Ply at 48" Top

2 - 3/4" Ply at 46 1/2" Shelves

3 - 1x2 at 45" Shelf Trim

2 - 1x2 at 30 1/4" Side Trim

2 - trim/molding at 17 1/4" + up depending on the trim you choose.

1 - trim/molding at 49" + up depending on the trim you choose.

Cut List Image 
Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials!

Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices.

Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1

Attach the Top to the Sides: Use your Kreg Jig set for 3/4" stock and your 1 1/4" pocket hole screws and glue or your 1 1/4" Wood Screws and glue. Be sure to countersink if you aren't using a Kreg Jig.

Step 1
Step 2

Attach the Shelves: Secure using your Kreg Jig Set for 3/4" stock and your 1 1/4" pocket hole screws and glue or your 1 1/4" wood screws and glue. Be sure to countersink if you aren't using a Kreg Jig.

Step 2
Step 3

Attach the Trim: Fasten using 1 1/4" finish nails and glue or secure trim pieces together using your kreg jig set for 3/4" stock and your 1 1/4" pocket hole screws and glue and then secure to the unit using 1 1/4" finish nails and glue.

Step 3
Step 4

Attach the Top Trim or Molding: Miter at the front corners and tack on using 1 1/4" finish nails and glue.

**This step will be a mark and measure step, meaning that the trim you choose will determine the side and front measurements since the larget the trim itself, the longer it will stick out in front and on the sides. This factor is important to note and cut to the proper dimensions by marking off and then cutting/mitering to size.

Step 4
Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

Note

If you enjoyed this post PLEASE STUMBLE IT! Definitely comment below, Share it or Like it, and subscribe to my feed to stay up to date!

You can now also:

Follow my blog with blog lovin!

I'm linking this fine project up here

Living 
Disclaimer

**Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you provide an adequate link back to the appropriate post! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it.

RyTurner's picture

DIY California Chic Ombre Curtains

I cut lengths of cotton muslin, purchased in a 15 yard bolt at my local fabric store for around $20, into 4 panels at 8’. Since my backyard is something is fairly small, I chose to work on this project in my guest bathroom. If you also plan to attempt a project of this nature indoors, be sure to keep in mind that your bathroom will be otherwise unavailable for 2-4 days while your panels air dry… unless of course you get clever and find away to shower around your panels. I clipped the panels up over my shower curtain rod, thereby creating a section of the fabric that I am able to keep white; it was about 1/4 of the total length of the fabric.

Taxonomy upgrade extras 
Project Image

This project has been a long time coming. We talked a bit here about how many curtain projects will need to be completed before I have no more naked windows in my home! In other words... almost all of them! 2 down and 2 million to go, but one by one we shall get them all covered and looking snappy!

If you enjoyed this post, comment below, Share it or Like it, and subscribe to my feed to stay up to date!

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For the first 2 steps in this project I used this premixed Fabric Spray Paint, there are a few varieties to be found at the fabric or craft store and I chose this particular one for the color. For the last 2 steps in this project I purchased RIT fabric dye in Indigo in a powdered concentrate that will need to be mixed with warm water in a large bin or bucket of some sort. The fabric, and 2 varieties of dye were all that were required to complete this fun project so the cost was very minimal.

Since the object of ombre is to gradually step down (or up) the color saturation in a gradation, I began by creating the color for the lightest of the 3 dyed sections that I will complete, which was a dilution of 1/4 oz. of the Fabric Spray paint mixed with 3 3/4 oz. of water.

This squeeze bottle was the perfect 4oz. vehicle to deliver this color up near the top of my panels, since the first 2 layers of color were to be done using a dye that was not the sort to be mixed in a bucket or bin. A traditional squirt bottle would also be fabulous.

Before I removed each panel from the dye bath, I used a plastic spoon to simply scoop and splatter the indigo dye up onto a portion of the previous section of color allowing it to blend a bit with the turquoise like teal shade I had previously completed. Yes, I was adding another section of color to the mix, but truthfully it needed to be done to make this into the set of curtains I had envisioned for my family room.

I followed the same process for mixing the second section of color only this time I mixed a ratio of 1:1 or 2 oz. of fabric spray paint and 2 oz. of water into the same squeeze bottle and sprayed my heart out beginning about 18 inches to 2 feet from where the first color began (4 sections, each about 2 feet in length for a total of 8 feet).

All I had to do was squirt my dye in a relatively random pattern and yet in a somewhat straight line. I wanted the sections to be well delineated but I didn’t want a perfectly clean line of color. You can see that this first color which butts up against the white section is very light and the perfect intro into the saturated sections.

The instructions on the package for the Fabric Spray Paint suggested allowing it to air dry and so I did for about a day or so. My original plan was to continue with the last color at 100% fabric paint with no dilution, but it was beginning to look much more turquoise than teal and so I decided to throw the Indigo RIT dye into the mix for a more purpley navy specimen of blue.

I mixed about 1/2 the box of concentrated powder according to the instructions on the box right into this small bin and set the bin into the shower along with my panels so the bottom of each panel could soak by hanging right into the dye for about an hour or so.

I allowed the panels to drip dry for a day before throwing them into the wash on a gentle cycle followed by a tumble dry, and then hanging them to enjoy!

I continued on in this manner allowing each panel to rest in the dye for around an hour, then scooped and splattered the adjacent 14 inches or so before moving onto the next panel.

I did this one panel at a time, and you can see that the color was taking well, but of course there was that perfectly straight line I was trying to avoid…

Sep
25
2011
Project Image

I am no master carpenter, and some of this was challenging for me, but thanks for the great plans, and a project I really needed to store my picture frame backings and accessories.

I have a lot of wide flat articles to store and that need some protection from shop elements.

I first thought of buying what is called a flat file or map file. These are storage files that are used often by artists, framers, and engineers to store art and plans that they don’t want to fold up. These units costs anywhere from $400 to several thousand dollars.

Whenever you see one advertised from Amazon or google for less, it is always just the base or cap or some accessory to the file

Estimated Cost 

This project cost my about $220…but that included buying way too much paint…did you know how far a gallon can go? I also bought a Kreg jig Jr. & a craig clamp which worked well made much of the work a breeze.

Finishing Technique 

I gave the top a Roman Ogee profile & some weird profile with the ogee bit on the two front legs.

Great project and first foray into a paint finish. I like the color which I tried to match with the plan. Did I get close?

All this thing needs is a polyacrylic finish for the top.

Sep
24
2011
Project Image

I feel like in many ways we have 'been there done that' when it comes to wallpaper and the frilly damask variations of pattern that aren't actually very varied at all. It's not that they aren't beautiful, in fact many are...it's that after years and year of it now, over and over, it feels a tad like a broken record. Enough already... can we move onto another trend please? But this... this is a completely different style, pattern, feeling than we have seen before. Entirely... It feels a tad nautical, a tad modern, a tad storybook-like, a bit moody... in other words... perfection!

Sources
Sep
23
2011
Project Image
Project Details

This project took me about 30 minutes to complete...that's it! And 20 of those 30 minutes was spent letting the glue dry while I chatted with you fine friends on Facebook and Google+! Can I get a yahoo? It's really that simple, and very inexpensive of course, not to mention the possible uses this baby has are utterly endless! I urge you to take a peak a the original inspiration for this piece to see how they have used it. Pretty cool over that table...

The Deets

For the rest of you, this project would be a fabulous addition to any home decor with a rustic reclaimed finish especially this time of year! Can't you see this with pumpkins all around, corn stalks and scare crows... ah, decor bliss I tell you!

Showcase: Built From These Plans

Estimated Cost

Under $25

Tools

Saw - optional, unless you have your local lumber supply make cuts for you.

Drill

1" Spade Bit or Hole Saw Bit.

Lumber

2 - 2x3 at 8'

1 - 1" Round Dowel at 48"

1 - 1" Round Dowel at 36"

Materials

Wood Glue

Sanding Supplies

Finishing Supplies

Safety Gear

Cut List

2 - 2x3 at 7'

5 - 1" dowel at 15 1/2"

Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials!

Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices.

Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1

Cut your ladder legs and rungs: The legs should be 7' and the rungs (dowels) should be 15 1/2" each and you will need 5 of those!

Step 1
Step 2

Mark and Drill Your Legs: Starting at the top (or bottom) of your legs, mark out 14" increments. It divides evenly with 7' so it should work out perfectly. Mark not only at 14" but also the middle of each board width so that you know where to drill your holes!

Tape off your Spade Bit (this is the type I use below and I used blue painter's tape to mark it) or Hole Saw bit, at about 1/2" from the bottom of the flat part on a spade bit (not the bottom point) and 1/2" up from the edge of a hole saw bit. The tape will tell you when to stop drilling so that your hole is only 1/2" deep.

I personally enjoy the spade bit a tad more as I feel like it cuts better and faster, but this is just personal preference, and either will do the job.

Step 2
Step 3

Once all of your hole pairs are drilled, you can put a bit of glue in each hole down one board. Pop in your rungs, they should fit perfectly, and then place a drop of glue down the other board in each hole and set that baby right on top of the rungs and lower leg. This should help you put enough weight on the lower leg and rungs and of course the top leg will be supplying it's on weight.

Carefully let it sit like this, or even clamp it (I didn't) and let the glue set up for 20 minutes or so.

Step 3
Step 4

That's it, you are done! Finish however you prefer. I used a driftwood colored stain on mine, and left all of the markings that were already there. I am not in love with it just yet, and pretty sure it needs a good sanding and another color of stain to really look reclaimed. But, it works for now!

Step 4
Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

Note

If you enjoyed this post PLEASE STUMBLE IT! Definitely comment below, Share it or Like it, and subscribe to my feed to stay up to date!

You can now also:

Follow my blog with blog lovin!

DIY 
Living 
Knock Offs 
Disclaimer

**Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you provide an adequate link back to the appropriate post! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it.

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