Jul
31
2012
Project Image

The two areas of a home I most frequently hear complaints about are kitchens and bathrooms, hands down. Everyone wants a gourmet or spa like feel in their retreats, and it seems these are the areas people feel the most apprehensive about making dramatic changes to, outside of paint and accessories.

 The idea of remodeling can be scary and intimidating, but can it be done? And on a budget? Well of course it can!  

Planning and Budget

Replace or Repair?

If it can be fixed rather than replaced it will save you quite a bit. In the DIY blogging world, we are masters of our domain and repairing and upcycling are something we excel at. Why not carry this mentality into your design project every chance you get? If you can update rather than purchase new hardware, while you refinish your existing cabinetry you may save yourself a considerable amount of money. Go vintage... give your space a bit of a lived in flair. Save yourself in cost while adding some truly unique features to your bath.

Nothing can be compared to the serene spa like experience a bathtub can provide, so if you can skimp in other areas in order to splurge here, you may truly feel the value of every dime to your dollar. A variety of bathtubs such as soft bathtubs, whirlpool bathtubs and hot bathtubs are available in the market. You might actually pass out from some of the amazing technologies found today. 

In terms of practicality, single person bathtubs are always going to be easier to clean and maintain (not to mention use) than double person bathtubs. If your bathtub is a fiber glass tub, and it has a few cracks, it's actually possible to repair it yourself. If the problem is beyond repair, then you can install a liner, but perhaps this is an area where you might choose to let a professional help you out. 

Flooring and Lighting

You should use appropriate flooring for your bathroom, bottom line. This is an area I think requires a bit of thought and consideration. Don't be fooled here, thought and consideration don't necessarily translate to cost, it simply means that you should choose a flooring material that will handle the water and moisture well. It would be devastating to redo your bath only to have to repair again in the future where water has damaged something. Practicality is king here. Hardwood flooring in the bathroom is not likely to be your best choice simply because the materials do not stay wear well in a moist environment, however a vinyl wood-like flooring might be a fabulous compromise. Yes I said vinyl... it's come a long way folks, and you might consider checking out your options.

Lighting in the bathroom can make or break the space. If you have a way to allow natural light into the space, so much the better, but if not, your lighting choices should attempt to mimic a light bight naturally lit environment as best as possible. A brighter bath can change your mood. If you can remodel in such a way that you can allow plenty of sunlight to come in, perhaps by adding a window, your investment will be well spent.  Choose your lighting fixtures according to the size of the bathroom—there is such a thing as too bright! More typically though, lighting fixtures tend to be a bit undersized. Consider that sunlight and daylight are best suited for your bathing and dressing needs while subdued lighting can make you feel more relaxed, so pick a fixture appropriate to your needs and wants as a homeowner and person who will actually use this bathroom for it's intended purpose. 

Storage, Storage, Storage

When it comes to bathroom storage and organization, you should consider your needs once again and go for vertical storage or shelving where space is limited. Vertical storage spaces can actually be better than their alternatives, because they allow you more room to maneuver in a potentially small space, and they utilize what space you do have in a more clever manner. When in doubt, think up... this is always my motto. 

Consider unconventional options. Why spend time, money and energy on replacing or adding traditional bathroom cabinetry, if this isn't even your style. Go with something more furniture like that still accomplishes the same thing. If it's not a standard structural piece, you run a better chance of being able to create it yourself, and this will add both style and savings to your bottom line. 

Remodeling a bathroom is no easy task. Considering your goals, planning, and attempting to salvage as much of the space and it's parts as possible is going to save you time and money in the long run. There are aspects of this job that should probably be left to the professionals (like the plumbing and electrical) but many of the remaining tasks can be done on your own and will save, save, save you quite a bit on cost! 

Sources

Images via: 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6

Jul
30
2012
Project Image
Project Details

Free and Easy DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Ballard Designs Inspired Sorrento Console, perfect as a media center, a console table, sideboard or storage piece!

Showcase: Built From These PlansI am so honored each and every time one of you fine friends builds from these very plans! If you have built this piece, please take a moment and showcase your build! We are dying to see your fabulous hard work!

Dimensions
Dimensions for This Project
Tools
  • Tape Measure
  • Saw – Jig, Circular, or Miter
  • Drill
  • Square
  • Sander
  • Kreg Jig
  • Router with 3/8” rabbeting bit
  • Hammer
  • Chisel
  • Brad Nailer
Lumber
  • 6 – 1x2 at 8’
  • 2 – Baseboard trim at 8’
  • 2 – sheets of ¾” plywood
  • 1 – sheet of ¼” plywood, lauan, or hardboard
Materials
  • 1-1/4” pocket hole screws
  • 1-1/4” brad nails
  • 4 – knobs for doors
  • 4 sets of hinges
  • Mirrors for doors
  • Edge banding for plywood
  • Wood filler
  • Sandpaper
  • Wood glue
  • Finishing Supplies
Cut List
  •  1 – ¾” plywood at 16-3/4” x 72” – Bottom
  • 2 – ¾” plywood at 16-3/4” x 34-1/4” – Sides
  • 2 – ¾” plywood at 3-1/2” x 16” – Bottom Supports
  • 1 – ¾” plywood at 3-1/2” x 72” – Trim Support
  • 2 – ¾” plywood at 16-3/4” x 30” – Dividers
  • 2 – ¾” plywood at 16-3/4” x 21” – Middle Shelves
  • 2 – ¾” plywood at 16” x 24-3/4” – Outer Shelves
  • 1 – ¼” plywood, lauan, or hardboard at 30-3/4” x 73-1/2” - Back
  • 1 – 1x2 at 21” – Front Stretcher
  • 4 – 1x2 at 21-3/4” – Door Frames
  • 2 – 1x2 at 27” – Door Frames
  • 4 – 1x2 at 30” – Door Frames
  • 1 – ¾” plywood at 17-3/4” x 75” – Top
  • 8 – 1x2 at 7-5/8” – Doors
  • 8 – 1x2 at 27-1/2” – Doors
  • 2 – Baseboard trim at 16-3/4”
  • 1 – Baseboard trim at 74-1/2”
Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1

 

Edge banding should be applied to exposed plywood edges before assembly.

 Cut the pieces for the bottom and the sides. Set the Kreg jig for ¾” material and drill pocket holes in each end of the bottom. Also drill pocket holes in the top of the side pieces. Attach to the sides as shown in the drawing using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws.

Step 1
Step 2

Cut the pieces for the bottom supports. Drill pocket holes in one long end and secure to the bottom as shown using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws.

Cut the piece for the trim support. Attach to the cabinet with glue and 1-1/4” brad nails through the bottom and sides into the support. Add a few brad nails through the support into the bottom supports.

Step 2
Step 2
Step 3

 

Cut the pieces for the dividers. Drill pocket holes in each end and attach to the bottom using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws. 

Step 3
Step 4

Cut the pieces for the outer shelves. Drill pocket holes in each end. The shelves will be located ¾” back from the front edge of the sides. Attach with glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws.

Cut the pieces for the middle shelves. Drill pocket holes in each end. These shelves are flush with the outside edge of the dividers. Attach to the dividers as shown using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws.

Step 4
Step 5

Cut the piece for the back. Attach using glue and 1-1/4” brad nails.

Step 5
Step 6

Cut the piece for the front stretcher. Drill pocket holes in each end and attach to the dividers using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws.

Step 6
Step 7

 

Cut the piece for the top. The top overlaps the front and sides by ¾”. Attach to the cabinet using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws through the top of the sides and dividers into the top piece.

Step 7
Step 8

 

Cut the pieces for the door frames. Assemble as shown using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws. Attach to the cabinet with glue and 1-1/4” brad nails through the sides and dividers into the frames. Add a few nails through the frames into the shelves.

Step 8
Step 8
Step 9

 

Cut the pieces for the doors. Drill pocket holes in each end of the shorter pieces. They will have to be located so they do not interfere with the router when cutting the rabbets. Assemble with glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws.

Using the router and a rabbeting bit, cut a 3/8” rabbet around the inside of the frame for the mirrors. Use a hammer and chisel to square the corners of the rabbet. Attach the mirrors using adhesive or a framing tab gun.

Step 9
Step 9
Step 10

Cut the pieces of baseboard. Secure the side pieces first using 1-1/4” brad nails, then attach the front.
Attach the doors with the hinges, and attach the knobs to the doors.

Step 10
Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

Knock Offs 
Disclaimer

**Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you provide an adequate link back to the appropriate post! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it.

Jul
30
2012
Project Image

I'm super excited to announce that the finalist from our entries has been chosen! This was such a difficult contest for me to judge and I consider that a good thing. You guys blew my mind with an amazing 800+ entries! I personally read and scored each and every one of them and wanted so badly to choose them all! Some of you made me laugh, made me cry, convinced me that without this your home might wash away the next time it rains.... This was truly a difficult decision and I am honored that so many of you took the time to enter. I wish I could have chosen each and every one of you!

Ick!  . . . behold . . . mold

On the shower door, on the carpeted floor

Nevermind the plastic wood door

The lighting is dated, and

The paint color is hated

The mirror over the toilet

Yep, totally spoils it

A bath reno is required

Because I am so tired

Of scrubbing the ugly away;

Keeping friends and family astray;

And starting each day in dismay.

A sparkling new bath

Would make me and my guy laugh.

In desperate need of a boost for this roost!

Come on, a carpeted stair

Is right next to that ‘chair’!

I’m not asking for much

Just a bath that’s clean to the touch. 

Jul
28
2012
Project Image

Today's topic is all about giving you some inspiration on how you might use reclaimed wood in your homes and for your accessories. So before you throw out that old piece of furniture or fallen tree trunk in your yard, why not get creative and use a bit of the materials to make something fabulous!

Design 
DIY 
Sources

1 / 2 / 3 / 4  / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12 / 13 / 14

Jul
27
2012
Project Image
Project Details

These stackable storage benches are sublime, not to mention easy to build! Build 1, build 2, or interchange them with other pieces in the District Storage Collection like the storage bin bench!

Showcase: Built From These PlansI am so honored each and every time one of you fine friends builds from these very plans! If you have built this piece, please take a moment and showcase your build! We are dying to see your fabulous hard work!

Estimated Cost

$50-$75

Dimensions
Dimensions for This Project
Tools
  • Tape Measure
  • Saw – Jig, Circular, or Miter
  • Drill
  • Countersink Bit for Drill
  • Square
  • Sander
  • Kreg Jig
  • Brad Nailer
Lumber
  • Half sheet of ¾” plywood
  • Quarter sheet of ¾” plywood
  • 2 – 1x2 at 8’
  • 1 – 1x3 at 2’
  • 1 – 1x4 at 2’
  • Quarter sheet of ¼” plywood, lauan, or hardboard
Materials
  • 1-1/4” pocket hole screws
  • 1-1/4” brad nails
  • Edge banding for edges of plywood
  • 2 – Angle brackets (to secure 2 units together if stacked)
  • 4 – Hinges
  • 2 – Drawer pulls or knobs
  • Wood filler
  • Sandpaper
  • Wood glue
  • Finishing Supplies
Cut List
  •  2 – 1x2 at 10-1/2” – Bottom Frame
  • 2 – 1x2 at 38-1/4” – Bottom Frame
  • 4 – 1x3 at 4” – Feet
  • 4 – 1x4 at 4” – Feet
  • 2 – ¾” plywood at 13-1/2” x 39-3/4” – Top & Bottom
  • 4 – ¾” plywood at 12” x 13-1/2” – Dividers
  • 4 – 1x2 at 12” – Stretchers
  • 2 – 1x2 at 12-3/4” – Stretchers
  • 1 – 1/4” plywood, lauan, or hardboard at 13-1/2” x 39-3/4” – Back
  • 2 – ¾” plywood at 11” x 11-3/4” - Doors
Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1

Apply edge banding to exposed plywood edges before assembly.

Cut the pieces for the frame. Set the Kreg jig for ¾” material and drill pocket holes in each end of the shorter pieces. Assemble as shown using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws.

Step 1
Step 2

If building the units to stack, do not build the feet for each unit. The only piece that will need feet is the base unit.

Cut the pieces for the feet. Cut the angle as shown. Assemble with glue and 1-1/4” brad nails. There will be two left feet and two right feet. Attach to the frame with glue and 1-1/4” brad nails.

Step 2
Step 2
Step 3

Cut the piece for the bottom. Attach to the frame and feet with glue and 1-1/4” brad nails through the bottom into the frame.

Step 3
Step 4

Cut the pieces for the dividers. Drill pocket holes in each of the shorter ends of the dividers. Attach to the bottom at the spacing indicated using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws.

Step 4
Step 5

Cut the pieces for the stretchers and drill pocket holes at each end. Attach as shown using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws.

Step 5
Step 6

Cut the piece for the top. Attach using glue and 1-1/4” brad nails through the top into the dividers and stretchers.

Step 6
Step 7

Cut the piece for the back. Attach using glue and 1-1/4” brad nails.

Step 7
Step 8

Cut the pieces for the doors. There will be a 1/8” gap around all sides of the doors. Pre-drill the holes for the handles or knobs. Shim the doors in place and attach the hinges.

Step 8
Step 9

 

If stacking two units, attach the angle brackets to the frame of the bench that will go on the top, then secure to the top of the lower bench.

Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

Kiddos 
Knock Offs 
Disclaimer

**Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you provide an adequate link back to the appropriate post! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it.

Jul
26
2012
Project Image
Jul
25
2012
Project Image
Project Details

The perfect starter piece for this fabulous collection we will be covering! These Free and easy DIY Furniture Plans for the Land of Nod Inspired Little Sloan Leaning Desk are sure to give your little people something fun to work and play on.

Showcase: Built From These PlansI am so honored each and every time one of you fine friends builds from these very plans! If you have built this piece, please take a moment and showcase your build! We are dying to see your fabulous hard work!

Estimated Cost

$25-$50

Dimensions
Dimensions for This Project
Tools
  • Tape Measure
  • Saw – Jig, Circular, or Miter
  • Drill
  • Countersink Bit for Drill
  • Square
  • Sander
  • Kreg Jig
  • Brad Nailer
Lumber
  • 2 – 2x2 at 6’
  • 2 – 1x2 at 8’
  • Quarter sheet of plywood
Materials
  • 1-1/4” pocket hole screws
  • 1-1/4” screws
  • 1-1/4” brad nails
  • Edge banding for plywood
  • Angle brackets to secure to wall
  • Wood filler
  • Sandpaper
  • Wood glue
  • Finishing Supplies
Cut List
  • 2 – 2x2 at 54-15/16” – Legs
  • 3 – 1x2 at 27” – Stretchers
  • 1 – ¾” plywood at 10” x 27” – Shelf
  • 2 – 1x2 at 27” – Shelf & Desk TopBorder
  • 2 – 1x2 at 9-1/4” – Shelf Border
  • 1 – ¾” plywood at 18” x 27” – Desk Top
  • 2 – 1x2 at 6-1/2” – Desk Top Border
Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1

Cut the pieces for the legs. Cut the angle in the bottom of the legs as shown. The back of the legs, when set on the angle will rest approximately 7” from the wall when the bookcase is completed.

Step 1
Step 2

Cut the pieces for the stretchers. Set the Kreg jig for ¾” material and drill pocket holes in each end of the stretcher pieces. The top stretcher piece will be perpendicular to the top of the legs. The remaining stretchers will follow the angle with the back of the stretchers 3/16” higher than the front. When set on the angle, the bottom of the stretcher will be flush with the legs. The top will stick out a little which is fine because they will not be visible under the shelf and desk top.

Attach the stretchers to the legs at the spacing indicated using glue and 1-1/4” brad nails. 

Step 2
Step 3

Cut the pieces for the shelf and border. Drill pocket holes in one end only of each of the side pieces and attach to the back border piece. Attach the entire assembly to the shelf using glue and 1-1/4” brad nails through the bottom of the shelf into the border.

The shelf will be located approximately 6-15/16” from the front of the shelf to the top front of the corresponding stretcher. Secure the shelf to the stretcher and legs using glue and countersunk 1-1/4” screws.

Step 3
Step 3
Step 4

Cut the pieces for the desk top and border. Drill pocket holes in one end only of each of the side pieces and attach to the back border piece. Attach the entire assembly to the desk top using glue and 1-1/4” brad nails through the bottom of the desk top into the border.

The desk top will be located approximately 13-1/8” from the front of the desk top to the top front of the corresponding stretcher. Secure the desk top to the stretcher and legs using glue and countersunk 1-1/4” screws.

Step 4
Step 4
Step 5

Attach the desk securely to the wall as well as the floor with the angle brackets.

Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

Kiddos 
Knock Offs 
Disclaimer

**Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you provide an adequate link back to the appropriate post! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it.

Jul
24
2012
Project Image
Project Details

Many of you have been asking and now I am finally answering your pleas for this loft bunk that would accomodate a full sized mattress. Easy to build, and extremely budget friendly, this Free Woodworking plan to build a full sized low loft bunk is just the project for those of you who need a bit more vertical storage space. I always say, 'when in doubt...build up'!

Showcase: Built From These Plans

Estimated Cost

$100-$150

Tools
  • Tape Measure
  • Sander - if you are using Pine and staining you will need a Variable Random Orbital Sander, otherwise any automatic sander will work even the cheaper ones!
  • Saw
  • Drill
  • Kreg Jig®
Lumber
  • 2 - 4x4 at 10' Fence Posts - untreated
  • 1 - 2x6 at 10'
  • 2 - 2x6 at 8'
  • 3 - 2x4 at 10'
  • 5 - 2x4 at 8'
  • 1 - 2x4 at 6'
  • 1 - 2x4 at 6'
  • 5 - 1x4 at 10'
  • 1 - 1x4 at 8'
  • 1 - 1x4 at 6'
Materials
  • Qty 8 - 5/16" Carriage Bolts at 7" length Qty 8 -
  • Washers Qty 8 
  • Nuts Qty 8 - Nuts with rounded covers
  • 3" Screws
  • 2" Screws
  • 2 1/2" Pocket Hole Screws
  • 1 1/4" Screws
  • Wood Filler
  • Sandpaper
  • Finishing Supplies
Cut List
  • 4 - 4x4 at 54" (Legs)
  • 2 - 2x6 at 76" (Front and Back Rails)
  • 2 - 2x6 at 58" (Side Rails)
  • 3 - 2x4 at 76" (Upper Back Rails and Center Joist)
  • 4 - 2x4 at 58" (Upper Side Rails)
  • 1 - 2x4 at 23 1/2" (Front Guard Rail)
  • 2 - 2x4 at 57" (Front Upper Rails)
  • 2 - 2x4 at 60" (Ladder Rails)
  • 4 - 2x4 at 14" (Ladder Rungs)
  • 2 - 1x4 at 76" (Cleats)
  • 11 - 1x4 at 55" (Slats)
Instructions

**I recommend finishing your boards and posts prior to assembling and simply touching up later. This will make for easier painting and will keep you from having to paint this wherever this piece will actually live (bedroom) since you will have to assemble it in the area it will be placed (at 45 or more inches wide this will not fit through a doorway after it's assembled).

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1

Cut the Legs to size and attach the Cleat to the Front and Back Rails using 2" Screws.

To attach the Rails to the Legs you will arrange the 4 pieces as shown in the diagram below, making sure to leave 1 1/2" on either side of the Rails to allow for the Side Rails later, and clamp together making sure everything is completely square before you proceed. Once square and aligned as needed, you will use a 7/16" Drill Bit and drill through all 3 pieces on each side, creating 2 holes on either side for the bolts.

Fasten with your Carriage Bolts and tighten.

Step 1
Step 2

Attach the Side Rails to the Front and Back Rails then fasten the Upper Back Rails to the Back Legs. Once those are in place, fasten the Center Joist in roughly the center (duh). Use 3" Screws

Step 2
Step 3

Attach the Front Vertical Guard Rail, use 2" Screws. Then fasten the Front Upper Rails to it and the Front left or right Leg. Use 3" Screws to attach to the Leg.

Step 3
Step 4

Attach the Upper Side Rails on the side opposite where you choose to put the ladder, in my example this would be the left side. Use 3" Screws.

Step 4
Step 5

Lay your Slats approximately 4" apart. Be sure the 2 on the outside edges are flush in both corners. Screw down using 1 1/4" Screws.

Step 5
Step 6

Attach the remaining 2 upper Side Rails to the Back Rails and then either use a Pocket hole System (Kreg Jig) to create pocket holes and fasten to the front leg. If you don't own a Kreg Jig you can also countersink and predrill at an angle from the outside edge into the leg. Use 3" Screws

Step 6
Step 7

Create the Ladder. I give approximate dimensions for the height below, but the important aspect to focus on is the angle you will cut the top and bottom. The top of the ladder rails will be at a 75°angle and the bottom of the rails will be a 15°angle where the boards will rest on the ground.

Attach the rungs at approximately 8" apart (this will depend on the age of your kiddo, the smaller and younger, the closer together these should be, you need to consider how easy it will be for them to climb down) and parallel to the ground. Use 3" Screws to fasten the rungs to the rails and to fasten the rails to the Leg and Front Guard Rail. I suggest cutting away the point you will create at the very top, when you cut the 75°angle, for added safety. This will also give your ladder a bit of a hand grip up top.

Step 7
Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

Note

This post is brought to you by Bestlaminate -  offering premium laminate flooring

Kiddos 
Knock Offs 
Disclaimer

**Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you provide an adequate link back to the appropriate post! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it.

Jul
23
2012
Project Image

Many of you who have been with us here at TDC for a while, know I reside in the fabulous town of Sacramento in northern California. But perhaps you don't know much about what life is actually like here in good old Sactown... So I think we should do something about that, eh?

Details: One very lucky winner will win:

HOW TO ENTER:

This Family Friendly Weekend in Sacramento provides you many opportunities to enter to win! Click the login below (the Raffle Copter Giveaway) to start earning your entries!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Rules and guidelines:

  • All prizes expire August 10, 2013
  • Blackout dates for the hotel are August 9, 10, 11, 2012 and December 31, 2012.
  • US Residents only

Deadline to enter: Sunday, August 5, 2012 at 11:59PM PST

 

If you aren't acquainted with Trekaroo or Four in the City, let me make the introductions.... Trekaroo is the most fabulous way to get the inside scoop on everyday travel with kids. With thousands of kid-friendly activities, hotels, and restaurants, Trekaroo unearths delightful discoveries near and far. Adel at Four in the City is mother to a clever and hilariously funny 5 year old boy and a smiley, happy baby girl. She’s an internet junkie and her blog covers everything she holds close to her heart. Adel is a talented photographer and has been shooting and editing her son’s life since he was born. Perhaps she might teach us a few of her photography tricks...

It's truly an honor to be teaming with these folks and I'm glad to offer you all this opportunity! Now go... and enter...

Kiddos 
TDC 
Living 
Sources

Images via: Mariott International, here, and here

Jul
21
2012
Project Image

There is something utterly whimsical about the idea of an indoor swing... It seems the perfect addition to any modern home whether the style be rustic or refined, this is a look I'm absolutely willing to embrace! 

Design 
Outdoor 
Kiddos 
Sources

1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8

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