Aug
31
2012
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Project Details

Free DIY Furniture Plans to Build a West Elm Inspired Queen Stria Bed

Showcase: Built From These PlansI am so honored each and every time one of you fine friends builds from these very plans! If you have built this piece, please take a moment and showcase your build! We are dying to see your fabulous hard work!

Estimated Cost

$75-$100

Dimensions
Dimensions for This Project
Tools
  • Tape Measure
  • Saw – Jig, Circular, or Miter
  • Drill
  • Countersink Bit for Drill
  • Square
  • Sander
  • Kreg Jig
  • Brad Nailer
Lumber
  • 2 – 2x2 at 6’
  • 2 – 1x2 at 8’
  • 4 – 1x2 at 6’
  • One sheet of ¾” plywood
  • 2 – 1x4 at 8’
  • 17 – 1x3 at 6’
  • One sheet of ¼” plywood
Materials
  • 1-1/2” pocket hole screws
  • 1-1/4” screws
  • 5/8” brad nails
  • Surface mounted keyhole bed rail brackets (like these)
  • Wood filler
  • Sandpaper
  • Wood glue
  • Finishing Supplies
Cut List
  •  2 – 2x2 at 18” – Footboard Legs
  • 2 – 2x2 at 50” – Headboard Legs
  • 4 – 1x2 at 59” – Headboard & Footboard Frames
  • 1 – ¾” plywood at 4-1/2” x 59” – Footboard Panel
  • 1 – ¾” plywood at 36-1/2” x 59” – Headboard Panel
  • 2 – 1x4 at 84” – Sides
  • 2 – 1x2 at 81” – Slat Supports
  • 15 – 1x3 at 60-1/2” – Slats
  • 18 – ¼” plywood at 1-1/2” x 60-1/2” – Trim Slats
Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1

Cut the pieces for the legs and headboard/footboard frames. Set the Kreg jig for ¾” material and drill pocket holes in each end of the frame pieces. Attach to the legs using glue and 1-1/2” pocket hole screws as shown in the drawings.

Step 1
Step 2

Cut the pieces for the headboard/footboard panels. Drill pocket holes as shown. Attach to the frames using glue and 1-1/2” pocket hole screws. The faces of the panels will be flush with the faces of the frames.

Step 2
Step 3

Cut the pieces for the sides and slat supports. Attach the slat supports to the sides using glue and countersunk 1-1/4” screws. The bottom of the supports will be flush with the bottom of the sides. Attach the bed hardware according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Step 3
Step 4

 Cut the pieces for the slats. Attach to the supports using countersunk 1-1/4” screws. Do not use glue! 

Step 4
Step 5

Cut the pieces for the trim slats. Attach to the headboard and footboard as shown with approximately ½” spacing using glue and 5/8” brad nails.

Step 5
Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

Knock Offs 
Disclaimer

**Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you provide an adequate link back to the appropriate post! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it.

Aug
30
2012
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Easy Peasy… had some extra lumber in the what-if pile.. and put this plan to good use. Thanks Rayan..

Aug
29
2012
Project Image
Project Details

Free DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Restoration Hardware Inspired Pocket Desk Chair! I have actually loved this chair for a long time and I'm super excited to share plans with you today!

Showcase: Built From These PlansI am so honored each and every time one of you fine friends builds from these very plans! If you have built this piece, please take a moment and showcase your build! We are dying to see your fabulous hard work!

Estimated Cost

Under $25

Dimensions
Dimensions for This Project
Tools
  • Tape Measure
  • Saw – Jig, Circular, or Miter
  • Drill
  • Countersink Bit for Drill
  • Square
  • Sander
  • Kreg Jig
  • Brad Nailer
Lumber
  • 1 - 2x4 at 6'
  • 1 – 2x2 at 8’
  • 1 – 2x2 at 4’
  • 1 – 1x3 at 8’
  • Scrap of 1x2 at 12”
  • 1 – 1x4 at 2’
  • ¾” plywood at 2’ x 2’
Materials
  • 1-1/2” pocket hole screws
  • 2” pocket hole screws
  • 1-1/4” brad nails
  • Wood filler
  • Sandpaper
  • Wood glue
  • Finishing Supplies
Cut List
  • 2 – 2x4 at 24” – Back Legs
  • 2 – 2x2 at 16-1/4” – Front Legs
  • 2 – 1x3 at 11-1/2” – Aprons
  • 2 – 1x3 at 14” – Aprons
  • 2 – 2x2 at 14-11/16” – Lower Stretchers
  • 1 – 2x2 at 11-1/2” – Center Stretcher
  • 2 – 1x3 (ripped to 1-3/4” wide) at 11-1/2” – Back Slats
  • 1 – 1x2 at 11-1/2” – Upper Back Slat
  • 1 – ¾” plywood at 14-1/2” x 17” – Seat
  • 2 – 1x3 (ripped to 2” wide) at 4-7/8” – Pocket Sides
  • 1 – 1x4 (ripped to 2-3/4” wide) at 11-1/2” – Pocket Bottom
  • 1 – 1x4 at 13” – Pocket Back
Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1

Cut the pieces for the front legs. Draw the pieces for the back legs on the 2x4 and cut out using a jigsaw or a band saw.

Cut the pieces for the aprons. Set the Kreg jig for ¾” material and drill pocket holes in each end. Assemble as shown using glue and 1-1/2” pocket hole screws.

Step 1
Step 1
Step 2

Cut the pieces for the lower and center stretchers. Cut the angles as shown in the ends of the side stretchers. Set the Kreg jig for 1-1/2” material and drill pocket holes in each end of the pieces. Attach to the legs as shown using glue and 2” pocket hole screws.

Step 2
Step 2
Step 2
Step 3

Cut the pieces for the back slats. Set the Kreg jig for ¾” material and drill pocket holes in each end. Attach the 1x2 slat first. The outside face of this slat will be flush with the top of the back legs. Orient the pocket holes so they are facing down and attach to the legs using glue and 1-1/2” pocket hole screws.

Drill pocket holes in each end of the wider slats. The front face of these slats will be flush with the front face of the legs. Attach using glue and 1-1/2” pocket hole screws!

Step 3
Step 4

Cut the piece for the seat. Attach to the chair using glue and 1-1/2” brad nails.

Step 4
Step 4
Step 5

Cut the pieces for the pocket sides. Cut the angles as shown and drill pocket holes in the longer ends. Attach to the back legs as shown using glue and 1-1/2” pocket hole screws.

Cut the piece for the pocket bottom. Drill pocket holes in each end. Attach to the sides as shown using glue and 1-1/2” pocket hole screws.

Cut the piece for the pocket back. Attach as shown using glue and 1-1/4” brad nails.

Step 5
Step 5
Step 5
Step 5
Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

Kiddos 
Knock Offs 
Disclaimer

**Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you provide an adequate link back to the appropriate post! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it.

Aug
28
2012
Project Image

From grey painted wood floors to grey laminate flooring and tile, there is something of a perfect compromise in the gorgeousness that is a gray floor! We spoke earlier in the month about the dreamy and ethereal quality of white floors and while I absolutely adore the look, I'm fairly certain the responsibility is more than I can bear. But gray... oh j'adore gray...

Design 
Sources

1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8

Aug
27
2012
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Project Details

Free DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Pottery Barn Kids Inspired My First Table and Chairs and another fabulous project request

 

Showcase: Built From These Plans

Estimated Cost

$50-$75

Dimensions
Dimensions for This Project
Tools
  • Tape Measure
  • Saw – Jig, Circular, or Miter
  • Drill
  • Square
  • Sander
  • Kreg Jig
  • Brad Nailer
Lumber

**Materials/cut list for one table and two chairs**

  • 1 – 2x3 at 4’
  • 1 – 2x4 at 8’
  • 2 – 1x3 at 6’
  • 1 – 1x2 at 3’
  • 1 – ¾” square dowel at 3’
  • One quarter sheet of ¾” plywood
  • 2 – 3x3 posts at 3’
Materials

**Materials/cut list for one table and two chairs**

  • 1-1/4” pocket hole screws
  • 2” pocket hole screws
  • 1-1/4” brad nails
  • Wood filler
  • Sandpaper
  • Wood glue
  • Finishing Supplies
Cut List

**Materials/cut list for one table and two chairs**

  • 4 – 2x3 at 10-1/4” – Front Legs
  • 4 – 2x4 at 21” – Back Legs
  • 8 – 1x3 (ripped to 1-3/4”) at 8” – Seat Aprons
  • 4 – 1x2 at 8” – Back Slats
  • 4 – ¾” x ¾” dowels at 8” – Lower Stretchers
  • 2 – ¾” plywood at 10-5/8” x 11” – Seat
  • 4 – 3x3 posts at 16-3/4” – Table Legs
  • 4 – 1x3 (ripped to 1-3/4”) at 17” – Table Aprons
  • 1 – ¾” plywood at 24” x 24” – Table Top
Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1

Edge banding should be applied to all exposed edges of plywood before assembly.

Draw out the legs for the chairs on the lumber and cut out with a jigsaw. Clamp the pieces together and sand as one unit.

Step 1
Step 2

Cut the pieces for the seat aprons and rip to 1-3/4”. Set the Kreg jig for ¾” material and drill pocket holes in each end. Attach to the legs as shown using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws.

Step 2
Step 3

Cut the pieces for the lower stretchers from the ¾” square dowels. Drill a pocket hole in each end and attach as shown using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws.

 

Step 3
Step 4

Cut the pieces for the back slats. Drill pocket holes as shown and attach using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws. The front face of the slats will lay parallel to the angle on the front of the chair legs.

Step 4
Step 5

Cut the pieces for the seats. Cut the notches as shown using a jigsaw. Attach to the chairs using glue and 1-1/4” brad nails through the seat into the legs and aprons.

 

Step 5
Step 5
Step 6

Cut the 3x3 posts to length. Cut the pieces for the table aprons and rip to 1-3/4” wide. Drill pocket holes in each end, as well as one long edge of each apron to attach the top. Attach to the posts using glue and 2” pocket hole screws. The aprons will be set back ¼” from the outside edge of each leg.

Step 6
Step 7

Cut the piece for the top. Attach using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws through the pocket holes in the long edges of the aprons into the underside of the top.

 

Step 7
Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

Kiddos 
Knock Offs 
Disclaimer

**Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you provide an adequate link back to the appropriate post! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it.

Aug
24
2012
Project Image

I got the medicine cabinet plans from Design Confidential. Easy build but not easy to find the glass and drawer pulls I wanted. Neither Lowes nor HomeDepot offered opaque glass or plexiglass so I went to a local glass provider. Probably could have done better by just visiting my local flea market. I wanted drawer pulls that could hold a label but again not available locally. I found a wonderful web site for Kennedy Hardware and found just what I needed. Had to order twice what I needed to make the shipping costs worthwhile but I will use them on something later. Anyway I love the final result as do others that have seen it. I think if I make another one I will change the dimensions of the drawers to avoid any ends of the plywood showing forward. I will probably rework the present ones with some wood filler and fresh paint. If you build this project understand it is large and heavy so have substantial holding power when it is mounted on a wall.

The revised cabinet incorporates a photo of a medicine cabinet from a medeival French country hospita;.  Hope you like it.

Estimated Cost 

About $70 just because I wanted certain glass and drawer pulls. The cost of materials was not great but about one-half of the plywood was not used.

Length of Time 

I am estimating that the total time over four days was about 16 hours. Lots of time just waiting for glue and paint to dry before moving to the next step.

Lumber Used 

Nearly 100% pine. I did use poplar plywood for the drawers.

Finishing Technique 

Three coats of spray enamel paint on the visible surfaces and one or two coats on the other surfaces.

Additional Project Details 

I met Sonja Caldwell, a photographer, on Etsy.com who had taken a photgraph of a medicine cabinet in a medeival charity hospital.  She worked really hard to size and crop the picture so it would fit in the open area in my cabinet.  I really like the final result.  Looks almost 3D.

I thought I completed all of the forms to post my showcase project.  I hit save and three times it asked me for a Short Title.  I added the short title each time and hit save only to tell me  that I needed a short title. Anyone experience the same frustration?

Taxonomy upgrade extras 
Aug
23
2012
Project Image
Project Details

Free DIY Furniture Plans to Build a RH Baby & Child Inspired Finn Desk

Showcase: Built From These PlansI am so honored each and every time one of you fine friends builds from these very plans! If you have built this piece, please take a moment and showcase your build! We are dying to see your fabulous hard work!

Estimated Cost

$100-$150

Dimensions
Dimensions for This Project
Tools
  • Tape Measure
  • Saw – Jig, Circular, or Miter
  • Drill
  • Countersink Bit for Drill
  • Square
  • Sander
  • Kreg Jig
  • Brad Nailer
Lumber
  • 4 – 2x3 at 8’
  • 1 – 2x2 at 6’
  • 1 – 2x2 at 3’
  • 1 – 1x2 at 8’
  • 1 – 1x2 at 6’
  • 1 – 1x2 at 3’
  • 1 – 1x3 at 8’
  • 1 – 1x6 at 8’
  • 2 – 1x6 at 6’
  • Half sheet of ¼” plywood, lauan, or hardboard
  • One sheet of ¾” plywood
  • Half sheet of ¾” plywood
Materials
  • 1-1/4” pocket hole screws
  • 2-1/2” pocket hole screws
  • 1-1/4” brad nails
  • Five sets of 18” drawer slides
  • Five drawer pulls
  • Edge banding for plywood
  • Wood filler
  • Sandpaper
  • Wood glue
  • Finishing Supplies
Cut List
  • 8- 2x3 at 29-1/4” – Legs
  • 4 – 2x3 at 19” – Side Frames
  • 2 – ¾” plywood at 14-1/4” x 19” – Side Panels
  • 2 – ¾” plywood at 17-1/4” x 19” – Inner Side Panels
  • 6 – 2x2 at 10” – Back Frames & Lower Supports
  • 2 – 2x2 at 20” – Back Frame
  • 2 – ¾” plywood at 10” x 14-1/4” – Back Panels
  • 1 – ¾” plywood at 14-1/4” x 20” – Back Panel
  • 6 – 1x2 at 10” – Middle, Upper Supports & Upper Aprons
  • 2 – 1x2 at 20” – Upper Supports & Upper Aprons
  • 4 – 1x2 at 19” – Pullout Supports
  • 1 – ¾” plywood at 23” x 51” – Top
  • 8 – 1x6 at 9” – Drawer Boxes
  • 8 – 1x6 at 16-1/2” – Drawer Boxes
  • 2 – 1x3 (ripped to 2” wide) at 16-1/2” – Drawer Box
  • 2 – 1x3 (ripped to 2” wide) at 19” – Drawer Box
  • 4 – ¼” plywood, lauan, or hardboard at 9” x 18” – Drawer Bottoms
  • 1 – ¼” plywood, lauan, or hardboard at 18” x 19” – Drawer Bottom
  • 4 – ¾” plywood at 6” x 9-3/4” – Drawer Fronts
  • 1 – ¾” plywood at 2-1/2” x 19-3/4” – Drawer Front
  • 2 – ¾” plywood at 9-7/8” x 21-1/4” – Pullouts
Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1

Cut the pieces for the legs, side frames, side panels, and inner side panels. Set the Kreg jig for 1-1/2” material and drill pocket holes in each end of the side frame pieces. Attach to the legs as shown using glue and 2-1/2” pocket hole screws.

Set the Kreg jig for ¾” material and drill pocket holes in the side panels and inner panels as shown. Attach to the legs using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws.

The back face of the panels will be flush with the inside face of the legs.

Step 1
Step 2

Cut the pieces for the back panel frames. Set the Kreg jig for 1-1/2” material and drill pocket holes in each end of the side frame pieces. Attach to the legs using glue and 2-1/2” pocket hole screws.

Cut the pieces for the back panels. Set the Kreg jig for ¾” material and drill pocket holes in the back panels as shown. Attach to the legs using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws. 

Step 2
Step 2
Step 3

Cut the pieces for the lower supports. Set the Kreg jig for 1-1/2” material and drill pocket holes in each end of the lower supports. Attach to the legs using glue and 2-1/2” pocket hole screws.

Cut the pieces for the middle supports. Set the Kreg jig for ¾” material and drill pocket holes in each end. Attach to the legs using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws.

Step 3
Step 3
Step 4

Cut the pieces for the upper supports and pullout supports. Set the Kreg jig for ¾” material and drill pocket holes in each end of the upper supports . Attach to the legs using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws.

Drill pocket holes in one long end of each pullout support. Attach to the side panels and inner panels using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws.

Cut the pieces for the upper aprons. Drill pocket holes in each end. Attach to the legs using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws. Orient the pieces so that the pocket holes are facing up.

Step 4
Step 4
Step 5

Cut the piece for the top. The top will overlap the sides by ½” and the front by 1”. Attach the top using glue and 1-1/4” brad nails through the top into the legs, aprons, and supports.

Step 5
Step 6

Cut the pieces for the drawer boxes. Drill pocket holes in each end of the shorter pieces and assemble the drawers as shown using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws. Attach the bottoms using glue and 1-1/4” brad nails.

Attach the drawer slides according to the manufacturer’s instructions. For a tutorial, click here.

Step 6
Step 7

Cut the pieces for the drawer fronts. There will be a 1/8” gap around all sides of the fronts. For an easy tutorial on how to install the fronts, click here.

Cut the pieces for the pullouts. Apply edge banding and slide into place.

Step 7
Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

Kiddos 
Knock Offs 
Disclaimer

**Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you provide an adequate link back to the appropriate post! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it.

Aug
22
2012
Project Image
Project Details

Free DIY Furniture Plans to Build a RH Baby & Child Inspired Vintage Farmhouse Crates with Plans for all three sizes!

Showcase: Built From These PlansI am so honored each and every time one of you fine friends builds from these very plans! If you have built this piece, please take a moment and showcase your build! We are dying to see your fabulous hard work!

Estimated Cost

Under $25

Dimensions
Dimensions for This Project
Tools
  • Tape Measure
  • Saw – Jig, Circular, or Miter
  • Drill
  • Square
  • Sander
  • Kreg Jig
  • Brad Nailer
Lumber

For the Large crate:

  • 2 – 1x3 at 8’
  • 1 – 1x2 at 6’
  • 9 – ½” x 2 at 3’
  • 2 – ¼” x 2 at 3’
  • Scrap of ¾” plywood at 13-1/2” x 22-1/2”

For the Medium crate:

  • 2 – 1x3 at 6’
  • 1 – 1x2 at 6’
  • 5 – ½” x 2 at 3’
  • 1 – ¼” x 2 at 3’
  • 1 – ¼” x 2 at 2’
  • Scrap of ¾” plywood at 11-1/2” x 18-1/2”

For the Small crate:

  • 1 – 1x3 at 6’
  • 1 – 1x3 at 4’
  • 1 – 1x2 at 4’
  • 3 – ½” x 2 at 3’
  • 1 – ¼” x 2 at 3’
  • Scrap of ¾” plywood at 9-1/2” x 14-1/2”
Materials
  • 1” pocket hole screws
  • 1-1/4” pocket hole screws
  • 5/8” brad nails
  • 1-1/4” brad nails
  • 1-1/2” x 1-1/2” angle brackets
  • Two handles for each crate
  • Jute rope to wind around slats
  • Wood filler
  • Sandpaper
  • Wood glue
  • Finishing Supplies
Cut List

For the Large crate:

  • 4 – 1x3 at 14” – Frame
  • 4 – 1x2 at 14” – Side Frame
  • 4 – 1x3 at 19” – Frames
  • 4 – 1x3 at 10-1/2” – Side Frames
  • 1 – ¾” plywood at 13-1/2” x 22-1/2” – Bottom
  • 28 – ½” x 2  at 9” – Slats
  • 2 – ¼” x 2 at 10-1/2” – Side Trim
  • 2 – ¼” x 2 at 19” –Trim

For the Medium crate:

  • 4 – 1x3 at 12” – Frame
  • 4 – 1x2 at 12” – Side Frame
  • 4 – 1x3 at 15” – Frames
  • 4 – 1x3 at 8-1/2” – Side Frames
  • 1 – ¾” plywood at 11-1/2” x 18-1/2” – Bottom
  • 22 – ½” x 2  at 7” - Slats
  • 2 – ¼” x 2 at 8-1/2” – Side Trim
  • 2 – ¼” x 2 at 15” –Trim

For the Small crate:

  • 4 – 1x3 at 10” – Frame
  • 4 – 1x2 at 10” – Side Frame
  • 4 – 1x3 at 11” – Frames
  • 4 – 1x3 at 6-1/2” – Side Frames
  • 1 – ¾” plywood at 9-1/2” x 14-1/2” – Bottom
  • 16 – ½” x 2  at 5” - Slats
  • 2 – ¼” x 2 at 6-1/2” – Side Trim
  • 2 – ¼” x 2 at 11” –Trim
Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1

Cut the pieces for the frames. Set the Kreg jig for ¾” material and drill pocket holes in each end of the 1x3 pieces. Assemble as shown using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws.

Step 1
Step 2

Cut the pieces for the slats. Set the Kreg jig for ½” material and drill pocket holes at each end. There will be ½” spacing between each slat. Attach to the frames using glue and 1” pocket hole screws. Assemble the frames using glue and 1-1/4” brad nails.

Step 2
Step 3

Cut the piece for the bottom. Drill pocket holes and attach to the frames using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws. Orient the bottom so that the pocket holes face down.

Step 3
Step 4

Cut the pieces for the trim. Attach to the slats using glue and 5/8” brad nails. Add 1-1/2” x 1-1/2” angle brackets to the outer top as desired.

Attach handles to the upper sides. If cloth handles are preferred, use cotton belting, cut to length, and attach to the inside of the slats (at the center) using screws and washers.

Wind jute rope around slats as desired.

Step 4
Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

DIY 
Kiddos 
Knock Offs 
Disclaimer

**Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you provide an adequate link back to the appropriate post! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it.

Aug
21
2012
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As bloggers, parents, or just average air breathing humans, most of us want to know how to take amazing pictures and record our lives in a beautiful way. Many of us even have nice DSLR cameras and decent equiptment that should help us do this... but do we actually know what to do with this expensive stuff once we have it? The short answer is no. The long answer is also no...just in case you were wondering. But where do we begin?

First things first, we need to get a good handle on all of the pretty buttons our cameras have and what they do. The tutorial below is a great place to begin and will give you the lowdown on the most important features you need to pay attention to. 

A Quick Guide To Understanding Your DSLR Camera 

Once you have read through the article above, I recommend a quick read through the article below for some basic reminders and things to consider before you begin and while you are shooting. Some of these won't make a lick of sense to you yet (not to worry, we will get there) and others are so basic they bring about that sense of 'inner duh' that you might have overlooked otherwise (like the camera level for example). 

44 Essential Digital Camera Tips and Tricks

The article below is a fabulous list of things to keep in mind while getting to know your camera and learning to shoot. The perfect list of tips to help you cut through the crap and find the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow!

20 Things I Wish I knew About Photographing in Manual Mode

Once we have covered those few important key ingredients above we can dive into several of the topics with a bit more depth. Below I have outlined a number tutorials by subject matter. I hate to break it to you, but for this roundup most of the info is technical in nature. That's just the way it is while we are attempting to figure out how to use those fancy buttons. The next roundup will be a bit more fun, promise... But first let's get to know our cameras a bit more, shall we?

Handling and Caring for a DSLR Camera

The Basics of Exposure

Learning to Use Digital Camera Settings and Features

Tips, Tricks and Techniques

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