Jan
22
2015
The Design Confidential Builders Showcase // Michael's Variation on the Provence Beam Dining Table

I want to thank you for the plans on your site. The Provence beam table was exactly what I was looking for. I made a few modifications that you and your readers might be interested in for variety’s sake. The only good choice for outdoor wood here in Tucson was redwood, and 2x10s were not available, so I used 2x6s and did a mitered picture frame around the 10’ interior 2x6s (I used 12’ 2x6s for the outer pieces) giving a total length of 130”. I added a central post to give a bit more support to the middle of the span, and a better way to secure the table planks. I also built it to be 28” tall. I used biscuit joinery for all the base since I already had a biscuit joiner. I used Watco danish oil (natural) for the finish. The project took a weekend and a few evenings. The table will easily seat ten.

The main drawback to using the biscuit method is the necessity to clamp everything, but anyone who has a biscuit joiner probably already has an assortment of clamps. I ended up using a strap clamp made from two ratcheting tie-down straps ($20 from the local Ace Hardware) to clamp the table top parts. That would be easier with pocket screws.

Mitered Surround for The Design Confidential Builders Showcase // Michael's Variation on the Provence Beam Dining Table
Frame and Base for The Design Confidential Builders Showcase // Michael's Variation on the Provence Beam Dining Table
Profile View of Base for The Design Confidential Builders Showcase // Michael's Variation on the Provence Beam Dining Table
Table Profile for The Design Confidential Builders Showcase // Michael's Variation on the Provence Beam Dining Table
Table View from Top for The Design Confidential Builders Showcase // Michael's Variation on the Provence Beam Dining Table
Jan
20
2015
The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Andrew Table
Project Details

This fine looking specimen has quite a bit in common with one of our most loved on project plans, the Indoor / Outdoor Provence Beam Dining Table, but if you notice the fancy schmancy truss setup supporting this table, it is essentially like the Provence on steroids. So my friends, I will go so far as to say that if you have your heart set on the Provence, but you like an element of this new exciting guy, then by all means, build the Provence and add any modification from this set of plans to give it a little extra something. Or just build this table. Whatevs.

The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Andrew Table

Showcase: Built From These PlansI am so honored each and every time one of you fine friends builds from these very plans! If you have built this piece, please take a moment and showcase your build! We are dying to see your fabulous hard work!

Estimated Cost
$75-$100
Dimensions
Dimensions for The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Andrew Table
Tools
Lumber
  • 1 – 4x4 at 8’
  • 20 – 2x4 at 8’
Materials
Cut List

// Refer to specific steps in this plan before cutting pieces - some pieces are cut with angled ends and their exact measurements may differ from the measurements listed below. Measurements listed below are PRE-BEVEL dimensions and the actual end measurements will change once cut according to specific steps. 

  • 2 – 2x4 at 35” – Side Top
  • 2 – 4x4 at 35” – Side Bottom
  • 4 – 2x4 at 25” – Side Outsides
  • 4 – 2x4 at 10” – Side Inside A
  • 2 – 2x4 at 10-3/4” – Side Inside B
  • 2 – 2x4 at 15-3/4” – Side Inside C
  • 2 – 2x4 at 27-3/4” – Side Inside D
  • 1 – 2x4 at 89” – Center Bottom
  • 2 – 2x4 at 7-3/4” – Center Outside A
  • 2 – 2x4 at 20-3/4” – Center Outside B
  • 1 – 2x4 at 39-3/4” – Center Inside A
  • 1 – 2x4 at 27” – Center Inside B
  • 1 – 2x4 at 67-1/4” – Center Inside C
  • 12 – 2x4 at 96” – Table Top Boards
  • 2 – 2x4 at 42” – Table Ends
Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1

Cut the pieces for the Side Top and Side Bottom (current pieces shown in white for each step).

Side Top and Bottom for The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Andrew Table
Step 2

Next, cut the pieces for the Side Outsides. Set the Kreg jig for 1-1/2” material and drill pocket holes in both ends of each Side Outside piece. For this Table, we have located the pocket holes either facing the inside of the Table or facing the ground. Assemble as shown with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws.

Side Outside for The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Andrew Table
Step 3

Cut the pieces for the Side Insides. Using the Kreg jig, drill pocket holes in both ends of each Side Inside piece. Assemble as shown with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws.

Side Inside for The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Andrew Table
Step 4

Cut the piece for the Center Bottom.

Center Bottom for The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Andrew Table
Step 5

Next, cut the pieces for the Center Outsides. Using the Kreg jig, drill pocket holes in both ends of each Center Outside piece. Assemble as shown with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws.

Center Outside for The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Andrew Table
Step 6

Cut the pieces for the Center Insides. Using the Kreg jig, drill pocket holes in both ends of each Center Inside piece. Assemble as shown with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws.

Center Inside for The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Andrew Table
Step 7

Cut the pieces for Table Top Boards and Table Top Ends. Using the Kreg jig, drill pocket holes in both ends of each Table Top Board. To make sure that the Table Top is as flat as possible, drill several pocket holes along the long side of the Table Top Boards as shown below. Assemble as shown with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws.

(Bottom view)

Table Top for The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Andrew Table
Step 8

Lay the assembled Table Top on the ground with its bottom facing up. Next, position the assembled Table Sides on each end of the Table Top as shown below. The Table Sides will be positioned 3-1/2” from both the long and short edges of the Table Top. Attach the Table Sides to the Table Top with 2-1/2” wood screws through the Side Top into the Table Top. Drill pilot holes if necessary.

Sides Positioned for The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Andrew Table
Step 9

With the Table still upside down, place the assembled Table Center onto the Table Top, between the Table Sides as shown. Center Inside A and Center Inside C will be 8” from the Table Sides and 19-1/4” from the Table Top edges. The Center Bottom will be centered on the Side Bottoms, with 15-3/4” on each side as shown. Assemble as shown with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws. Flip this fancy table over and admire all those angle cuts!

Center Positioned for The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Andrew Table
Step 11
Step 12
Step 13
Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

Note
Disclaimer

// Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you ONLY use 1 image and provide an ADEQUATE link back to the original source and appropriate plan! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential. By accessing or using any part of the web site, you agree to become bound by the terms and conditions of this website as outlined under Terms of Use. If you do not agree to all the terms and conditions of this agreement, then you may not access the Website or use any services. The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by The Design Confidential.com and while we endeavor to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, personal injury or death, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of information or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of this website. I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it. The Design Confidential.com is inspired by but does not replicate exact designs, any similarities between these plans and items sold at specialty retailers is coincidential and not endorsed by or related to any said retailers. // Post May Contain Affiliate Links

Dec
17
2014
The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a King Sized Canopy Bed
Project Details

I just love a good modern and substantial canopy bed, don't you? Good thing for these free diy furniture plans to build a canopy bed, eh? This is avtually a really simple build so if you are looking for something fast with big impact you can make, this might just be the perfect thing!

The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a King Sized Canopy Bed

Showcase: Built From These PlansI am so honored each and every time one of you fine friends builds from these very plans! If you have built this piece, please take a moment and showcase your build! We are dying to see your fabulous hard work!

Estimated Cost
$175-$200
Dimensions
Dimensions for The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a King Sized Canopy Bed
Tools
Lumber
  •  8 - 4x4 at 8’ 
  • 14 – 2x8 at 8’
  • 7 – 2x4 at 8”
Materials
Cut List
  • 4 – 4x4 at 84” – Posts
  • 2 – 4x4 at 77” – Front and Back Frame
  • 2 – 4x4 at 94-1/4” – Frame Sides
  • 2 – 2x4 at 77” – Front and Back Top Rails
  • 2 – 2x4 at 94-1/4” – Top Rail Sides
  • 2 – 2x8 at 77” – Front and Back Platform
  • 2 – 2x8 at 94-1/4” – Platform Sides
  • 2 – 2x4 at 94-1/4” – Cleats
  • 1 – 2x4 at 94-1/4” – Center Support
  • 2 – 2x4 at 3-3/4” – Center Support Legs
  • 13 – 2x8 at 77” – Slats
Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1

Cut the pieces for the Posts, Front and Back Frame, and Frame Sides. Set the Kreg jig for 1-1/2” material and drill pocket holes in each end of the Frame pieces. Assemble as shown with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws. At this point, the Bed is upside down so that it is easier to assemble. Make sure that the pocket holes will face the ceiling when the bed is turned right side up.

Top Posts for The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a King Sized Canopy Bed
Step 2

Flip the piece over. Next, cut the pieces for the Front, Back and Side Top Rails. Set the Kreg jig for 1-1/2” material and drill pocket holes in each end of the Top Rail pieces. Assemble as shown with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws. Make sure that the pocket holes face the floor when assembled. 

Top Rails for The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a King Sized Canopy Bed
Step 3

Cut the pieces for the Front, Back, and Side Platform pieces. Set the Kreg jig for 1-1/2” material and drill pocket holes in each end of the Platform pieces. Assemble as shown with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws. Make sure the pocket holes face the inside of the Bed when assembled. In addition to the pocket screws, you can use 2” wood screws to attach the Top Rails to the Platform pieces.

Platform for The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a King Sized Canopy Bed
Step 4

Cut the pieces for the Cleats. Set the Kreg jig for 1-1/2” material and drill pocket holes in each end of the Cleats. Assemble to the Platform Sides as shown with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws. In addition to the pocket screws, you can use 2” wood screws to attach the Cleats to the Platform.

Cleats for The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a King Sized Canopy Bed
Step 5

Cut the pieces for the Center Support and Center Support Legs. Set the Kreg jig for 1-1/2” material and drill pocket holes in the top ends of the Center Support Legs and in each end of the Center Support. Attach the Center Support Legs to the Center Support with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws. Attach the Center Support to the Front and Back Platform pieces and assemble as shown with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws.

Center Support for The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a King Sized Canopy Bed
Step 6

Cut the pieces for the Slats. Attach the Slats to the Cleats and assemble as shown with glue and 2” wood screws.

Slats for The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a King Sized Canopy Bed
Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

Disclaimer

// Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you ONLY use 1 image and provide an ADEQUATE link back to the original source and appropriate plan! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential. By accessing or using any part of the web site, you agree to become bound by the terms and conditions of this website as outlined under Terms of Use. If you do not agree to all the terms and conditions of this agreement, then you may not access the Website or use any services. The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by The Design Confidential.com and while we endeavor to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, personal injury or death, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of information or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of this website. I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it. The Design Confidential.com is inspired by but does not replicate exact designs, any similarities between these plans and items sold at specialty retailers is coincidential and not endorsed by or related to any said retailers. // Post May Contain Affiliate Links

Dec
10
2014
Free DIY Toy Plans // How to Build a Children's Doll Accessory Ballerina Bar
Project Details

For your little ballerina, an adorable doll sized ballerina bar so your babe and her favorite 18 inch doll can have dance class together. This free plan for an easy to build doll ballerina bar is sure to please this holiday season. As part of our ongoing Handmade Holiday series, this project joins a well rounded group of adorable gifts you can make yourself!

Free DIY Toy Plans // How to Build a Children's Doll Accessory Ballerina Bar

Showcase: Built From These PlansI am so honored each and every time one of you fine friends builds from these very plans! If you have built this piece, please take a moment and showcase your build! We are dying to see your fabulous hard work!

Estimated Cost
$15-$25
Dimensions
Dimensions for Free DIY Toy Plans // How to Build a Children's Doll Accessory Ballerina Bar
Tools
Lumber
  • 1 - 1x2 at 4’
  • 1 - 3/4” plywood at 2’x2'
  • 1 – 3/8” dowel at 12”
Materials
Cut List
  • 2 – 1x2 at 12-1/2” – Mirror Sides
  • 1 – 1x2 at 9” – Mirror Bottom
  • 1 – 3/4” plywood at 3”x12” – Mirror Top
  • 2 – 3/4” plywood at 2”x8-1/2” – Mirror Stands
  • 2 – 1x2 at 2” – Bar Holders
  • 1 – 3/8” dowel at 9-3/4”– Bar 
Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1

Cut the pieces for the Mirror Sides and Mirror Bottom. Set the Kreg jig for 3/4” material and drill pocket holes in the top ends of the Sides and in each end of the Bottom. Place the screws so that a 1/4” rabbeting bit run along the inside of the Mirror will avoid them (see Step 5). Assemble as shown with glue and 1-1/4” pocket screws. 

Bottom and Sides for Free DIY Toy Plans // How to Build a Children's Doll Accessory Ballerina Bar
Step 2

Cut the piece for the Mirror Top. From each top corner, draw a 1-1/2” radius circle 3” radius circle. Next, measure and mark a 1-1/2” line from the top and side edges. Using your jigsaw, cut out the shape in the diagram. Attach to the Mirror Sides with glue and 1-1/4” pocket screws.

Mirror Top for Free DIY Toy Plans // How to Build a Children's Doll Accessory Ballerina Bar
Step 3

Cut the pieces for the Mirror Stands. Measure, mark and cut a 1” triangle on each top corner as shown. Using your jigsaw, cut out the shape in the diagram. Attach to the bottom of the Mirror Sides with glue and 1-1/4” wood screws.

Cutting the Stand for Free DIY Toy Plans // How to Build a Children's Doll Accessory Ballerina Bar
Attaching the Stand for Free DIY Toy Plans // How to Build a Children's Doll Accessory Ballerina Bar
Step 4

Cut the pieces for the Bar Holders. Connect each corner with a line to find the center as shown. Drill a 1/2” radius circle on the center of the “x,” approximately 1/4” deep. 

Creating the Bar Holder for Free DIY Toy Plans // How to Build a Children's Doll Accessory Ballerina Bar
Step 5

Next, measure, mark, and cut a 1/2” triangle on the bottom corner of the Bar Holder as shown. Using your jigsaw, cut out the shape in the diagram.

Finishing the Bar Holder for Free DIY Toy Plans // How to Build a Children's Doll Accessory Ballerina Bar
Step 6

Attach one of the Bar Holders to a Mirror Side with glue and 1-1/4” wood screws, screwed in from the back of the Mirror Side. The Bar Holder will be positioned 1/2” from the Mirror Side outer edge and 6-3/4” from the bottom of the Mirror Side as shown.

Attaching the Bar Holder for Free DIY Toy Plans // How to Build a Children's Doll Accessory Ballerina Bar
Step 7

Cut the piece for the Bar. The Bar will be 9-3/4” long – each end of the Bar dowel will extend into the 1/2” hole drilled into the Bar Holders. Position the second Bar Holder, similar to the first.

Bar for Free DIY Toy Plans // How to Build a Children's Doll Accessory Ballerina Bar
Step 8

Set router bit depth to cut a ¼” rabbet. Cut the rabbet on the inner back of the frame to allow for the mirror. Use a chisel and hammer to square the corners. Adhere the mirror using mirror adhesive or a tab framing gun. The mirror frame can be attached to the vanity with pocket screws through the side frame as well as metal mending plates.

Rabbeting with the Router for Free DIY Toy Plans // How to Build a Children's Doll Accessory Ballerina Bar
Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

Kiddos 
Disclaimer

// Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you ONLY use 1 image and provide an ADEQUATE link back to the original source and appropriate plan! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential. By accessing or using any part of the web site, you agree to become bound by the terms and conditions of this website as outlined under Terms of Use. If you do not agree to all the terms and conditions of this agreement, then you may not access the Website or use any services. The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by The Design Confidential.com and while we endeavor to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, personal injury or death, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of information or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of this website. I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it. The Design Confidential.com is inspired by but does not replicate exact designs, any similarities between these plans and items sold at specialty retailers is coincidential and not endorsed by or related to any said retailers. // Post May Contain Affiliate Links

Oct
02
2014
The Design Confidential Reader Showcase // Pottery Barn inspired Toscana Table

I am new to building furniture and I am so very thankful for these plans. Saved me a lot of money.

So I got married in June and was walking through Pottery Barn with her one day when she said how much she loved a certain Pottery Barn Table. The Toscana Table is a beautiful table but no way I was going to spend what they are asking for it. I blurted out that I could build that, mind you I had 0 building experience and had no idea where to even start. So, after Google sleuthing for a few days I came accross this website and these plans. They were absolutely a life savor. I did modify it though. I used 2x6's for the legs instead iof 2x4's. It gave a thicker look and I felt matched the Pottery Barn version more closely. Also, the skirt, instead of have the 2x4's being vertical, I laid them flat. The reasoning behind this is that my fiance is 6'2'' and I am 6'3'', wanted a little more room for our legs. This adjustment also allowed me to extend the table top past the legs a bit more. For the stain I used General Finishes Java Gel Stain. You will not find a better stain for your money. It was so easy to work with and the end result was a beautiful rich color. The top coat I used was Min-Wax High Build Polyurethane. I am very pleased with the results and I am so very thankful for these building plans. I discovered a hobby that I love and can't wait to build something else now.

Building the Legs for The Design Confidential Reader Showcase // Pottery Barn inspired Toscana Table
Attaching the Center Joist for The Design Confidential Reader Showcase // Pottery Barn inspired Toscana Table
To Read More About This Build, Visit This Blog Post 
Estimated Cost 

$100-$200

Length of Time 

2 weekends, about 32 hours

Modifications 
Lumber Used 

All Pine

Finishing Technique 
Additional Project Details 
Building the Support Frame for The Design Confidential Reader Showcase // Pottery Barn inspired Toscana Table
Angle Progress Shot for The Design Confidential Reader Showcase // Pottery Barn inspired Toscana Table
Finished Build and Stain for The Design Confidential Reader Showcase // Tahoe-Dude's Chesapeake Picnic Pable and Benches
Note
Sep
03
2014
Reader Showcase // John's PB Inspired Clara Buffet

I needed something to fill this empty space in my kitchen and the Clara Buffet was perfect! For this project, I chose to use oak, a red stain with brown and black accents, and brushed nickel hardware.

As always, thank you to TDC for the great plans and thanks for reading! Also, check out my blog post (link below) for a lot more build pictures and thoughts on each building step!

Here are images of the piece mostly assembled without the doors or drawers. As you can see, everything has already been finished to avoid tight corners. Drilling the space for the door hinges...this was nerve racking! As you can see I taped around the area to avoid any damage to the rest of the finish. This plus the flange on the hinge hid any defects. You can see the gusset  I added to the top inside edge of the side panels (see modifications section). This is what I secured the top with on the edges and it worked great.

Reader Showcase // John's PB Inspired Clara Buffet
Reader Showcase // John's PB Inspired Clara Buffet
Assembly with shelves and drawer frames added for Reader Showcase // John's PB Inspired Clara Buffet
Gusset added to top inside edge of side panels to screw down the top from the beneath for Reader Showcase // John's PB Inspired Clara Buffet
To Read More About This Build, Visit This Blog Post 
Estimated Cost 

Lumber was right over $200. Hardware, drawer slides, hinges, and staining materials were probably another $150 bringing the total to $350. Still a steep discount to the original!

Length of Time 

This is hard to estimate, but I'd say 20+ hours because of all the finishing work. Actual cutting and assembly of the piece was MUCH short and could probably be done in a weekend.

Modifications 

I made a few modifications to the plans for multiple reasons:

Shelves:

First, I eliminated the top set of shelves since they really only serve to enclose the space where the drawers go. Instead I used 1x2's to mimic the front edge of where the top shelves would have been. This provided rigidity to the piece and kept the look the same. 

Second, I had to slice off 3/4" from the indicated depth for the main shelves in the plans. Reason being, the plans call for the shelves to be set back this distance so that the doors can close but all four shelf pieces are dimensioned for the entire depth of the cabinet on the cut sheet.

Legs:

The plans call for 4x4's on the legs but I chose to try and recreate the original legs as closely as possible utilizing hardwood. This was for asthetics only and the original plans could be used with no issues here.

Top Connection:

I realized during assembly that I had not predrilled vertical pocket holes in the side panels to attach the top. Fortunately I had two 3/4" wide pieces of stained/finished plywood that I had sliced off the back of the shevles. I used these as gussets on the top inside edge of the side panels to secure the top from beneath which worked great.

Lumber Used 

As mentioned before, I used oak for almost every piece in the project besides the back for which I used birch plywood, the drawer boxes which are pine, and a couple of non-visible cross braces which are also pine.

Oak is a different animal working with but I really enjoyed the results. Make sure your cordless drills have good batteries! This stuff will eat up a battery real quick!

Finishing Technique 

The finish here was not difficult, but takes time. It consisted of red gel stain, brown glaze, black glaze, and final lacquer with sanding sealer sprayed on between each step. All stains and glazes were brushed on and wiped off.

I chose to prefinish all the individual pieces before assembly to avoid difficulties with tight corners. This had advantages and disadvantages; The former being that we achieved a very uniform and professional finish on the entire piece. Disadvantages to this technique include difficulties surrounding utilization of pocket hole plugs (see my blog), needing a very large space in order to stage all the pieces while drying, and needing to be careful during assembly. 

Gel Stain Added - Kind of red right now!..Glaze to the rescue for Reader Showcase // John's PB Inspired Clara Buffet
Weighing down the back with all the panels to get the bend out of the plywood! for Reader Showcase // John's PB Inspired Clara Buffet
Phew that's better; Brown and Black Glazes Added for Reader Showcase // John's PB Inspired Clara Buffet
Drawers and drawer slides added for Reader Showcase // John's PB Inspired Clara Buffet
Final assembled piece with all hardware added for Reader Showcase // John's PB Inspired Clara Buffet
Final assembled piece in new space for Reader Showcase // John's PB Inspired Clara Buffet
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