Aug
05
2014
Reader Showcase // Simple White Medicine Cabinet with Red Cross

My wife needed more storage space in her bathroom. We originally had shelves, but opted for something that she could close up and hide her beauty products if needed. Thanks for the great plans!

Estimated Cost 

$50

Length of Time 

4 days: 1 day for cutting, 1 for sanding and constructing, 1 for primer and paint, 1 for top coat

Modifications 

My wife didn't want the three small drawers, opting instead for one large door and more shelving space inside. I completed the cabinet door with plywood instead of glass and added a jigsawed plywood red cross on the front for a little more character. 

Lumber Used 

Pine

Finishing Technique 

Filled some holes with wood filler and sanded down. Followed with 1 coat of primer, 2 coats of semi-gloss white paint (to match our bathroom walls), then 3 coats of Minwax Polycrylic (sanding in between coats).

Additional Project Details 

I'm still relatively new to woodworking, so I hit a few snags. The two most difficult parts of this project were keeping the box and the door square, and finally mounting it to the wall in our bathroom (a wall which was not even). I mounted it to the wall using two 2" wood screws into studs and two drywall anchors and screws.

Front View with Finish for Reader Showcase // Simple White Medicine Cabinet with Red Cross
Inside Shelves and Storage for Reader Showcase // Simple White Medicine Cabinet with Red Cross
Aug
04
2014
Reader Showcase // Land of Nod Inspired Low Rise Crib

I appreciated the crib plans and wanted to show some pictures of what I did for the mending straps with photos.

This build cost me approximately $600 for materials.  It was straight up $300 for all the maple wood. Sand paper, scews, tung oil and woodshop rent time made up the rest.  It took about 2 months time to build.  I had a full woodshop and a master woodworking to advise me.  This crib was my first woodworking project ever. If I didn't have the woodshop and the master woodworker to ask advice I know this crib would not have been completed or come out as beautiful as it did. 

I agree with Josh and will repost his recommendations. Wish I had them when I had been working on my crib.

counter sinking
Adding Slats to side
Krieg jig maple plugs with 130 some Krieg holes to fill
Punching holes in nylon strip for mending strap
screws and washers holding nylon strip to mattress frame for mending strap
Eyelet to allow 1/4 screw into the crib frame where I put the 1/4 threaded inserts
Estimated Cost 

$ 500-600 for materials.  Work time and equipment will increase cost!

Length of Time 

2 months

Lumber Used 

Maple

Finishing Technique 

Tung Oil 

Additional Project Details 

Interior dimensions: the width meets federal spec but the length is 1/2 inch too long at 53'1/2. Simply cut all your length boards to 53 instead of 53'1/2 if you like. If I were to do the crib again, I'd probably cut the length to 52'1/2 inches, as this would be a perfect fit for almost all mattresses. If you go this route, remember to keep the mattress support slats flush with the top of the support frame to give a level surface. The pictures indicate the slats being inset a bit.

What helped us:

Wood spacers to place between the rails during installation.

We wanted to be able to disassemble the crib, so we put some finishing screws on the side of the crib and did not use glue

I would add recommending buying krieg jig PLUGS. They look much better than wood filling all the holes and probably save time and money for all the wood filler you use and wait time for drying and refilling the gaps that happen when the wood filler dries.  

I did not make the slanted leg supports but instead did a straight leg support.  I was told that the the slanted leg design might not hold up over time because they are a weak point of the body and with normal usage they are susecptible to breaking. 

For all the postings on federal law.  The law applies only to cribs for public purchase. If you are building it for your own use. You can make the slats however far or close you want. It is only a requirement for selling.  

Design confidential has a nice section on Lumber and The Raw Deal. Since I cut my own wood my length was nominal measured instead of the 'actual'.  For example: 1x3's are actually 3/4 x 2 1/2.     http://www.thedesignconfidential.com/2010/09/build-it-lumber-and-the-raw-deal

Because of this my slats ended up meeting the federal guidelines.  It did cause some other problems for me, particulary with the mattress frame. See Josh's recommendation above.

Hope that helps out anyone building this.

The Design Confidential Reader Showcase // Land of Nod Inspired Low Rise Crib
It's a Boy Reader Showcase // Land of Nod Inspired Low Rise Crib
Jul
31
2014
Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Modern Adirondack Chair
Project Details

I know you guys are going to be excited for this beauty! Today we have gorgeous new Free DIY Furniture Plans to Build an Outdoor Modern Adirondack Chair! That officially makes two plans for modern Adirondacks here on TDC (our others being the duo of Free Woodworking Plans to Build a Sawyer Adirodack Chair and Free Woodworking Plans to Build a Sawyer Adirondack Ottoman), because what would we be if not modern, am I right? Xx... Rayan

Showcase: Built From These PlansI am so honored each and every time one of you fine friends builds from these very plans! If you have built this piece, please take a moment and showcase your build! We are dying to see your fabulous hard work!

Estimated Cost
$50-$75
Dimensions
Dimensions for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Modern Adirondack Chair
Tools
Lumber
  • 7 – 1x4 at 8’
Materials
Cut List
  • 2 – 1x4 at 38-3/4” – Back Legs
  • 1 – 1x4 at 24-1/2”– Front Apron
  • 2 – 1x4 at 20-3/4” – Front Legs
  • 5 – 1x4 at 24-1/2” – Bottom Seat Slats
  • 2 – 1x4 at 21-1/2” – Seatback Frame Top and Bottom
  • 2 – 1x4 at 28-1/2” – Seatback Frame Sides
  • 1 – 1x4 at 27” – Seatback Frame Center
  • 7 – 1x4 at 23” – Seatback Slats
  • 2 – 1x4 at 4-1/4” – Arm Rest Rear Supports              
  • 2 – 1x4 at 30-3/4” – Arm Rests
  • 2 – 1x4 at 3” – Arm Rest Front Supports
Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1

Cut out your Back Legs. You will need 2 of these exactly the same. This diagram shows you how to mark out the shape you need for the Back Legs. Use your circular saw to cut this out. If you simply connect the dots between the dimensions outlined below and use a circular saw to make these cuts, you won't have to worry about the actual angle for each corner. Prepare the Back Legs to be attached to the Front Apron by drilling pocket holes on the inside front end. The ‘front’ of your Back Legs will be the end with only 1 angled cut, and the ‘back’ will be the end with 2 angled cuts. Select a side of the Back Leg to be the ‘inside,’ and make sure that the other Back Leg is the opposite, or a mirror of the first Back Leg.

Back Leg Dimensions for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Modern Adirondack Chair
Step 2

Cut out the Front Apron and attach as shown to the Back Legs with glue and pocket screws. When you attach the Front Apron, you will see that it is a little shy of covering the ends of the Back Legs – don’t worry, it will hardly be noticeable since this will be one amazing chair!

Front Apron for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Modern Adirondack Chair
Step 3

Drill a pair of pocket holes in the top end of the Front Legs (to later attach to the Arm Rests) and another pair of pocket holes approximately 8” down from the top end of each Front Leg, both on the side of the leg that faces the back of the chair. Attach the Front Legs to the Back Legs as shown with pocket screws.

Front Legs for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Modern Adirondack Chair
Step 4

Attach the Bottom Slats to the Back Legs as shown using glue and countersunk 1-1/4” screws or brad nails. The Slats should be spaced 1/4” apart.

Bottom Slats for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Modern Adirondack Chair
Step 5

Prepare the Seat back Frame pieces for assembly by screwing pocket holes in the ends of the top and bottom pieces and center piece. Assemble the Seat back Frame as shown using pocket screws.

Back Rest Frame for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Modern Adirondack Chair
Step 6

Attach the Backrest slats to the Backrest Frame as shown using glue and countersunk 1-1/4” screws or brad nails. The Slats should be spaced 1/4” apart.

Back Slats for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Modern Adirondack Chair
Step 7

Lay the entire chair on its side – it’s almost time to attach the Backrest to the chair! Measure 15” from the ends of the back legs as shown. Next, mark a 2-3/4” perpendicular line (lay down painter’s tape and mark on the tape if you do not want to mark on the wood) from this 15” measurement. Draw a 1” line parallel to the long edge of the board in the direction of the chair’s front (this line will be 3/4” from the edge of the board). Draw in the 3rd side of this triangle – you now have the angle for your Backrest – which is a comfy 110°! Repeat this process on the inside of the other Back Leg. 

Backrest Angle for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Modern Adirondack Chair
Attaching the Backrest for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Modern Adirondack Chair
Step 8

And now it’s time! Line up the Backrest to the Back Legs along the angles that were just drawn. Clamp the pieces together and drill 1/4” holes for the bolts. Insert the bolts and tighten with nuts.

Bolts and Nuts for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Modern Adirondack Chair
Step 9

Drill pocket holes in one of the 3-1/2” ends of the Arm Rest Rear Supports. Assemble the Arm Rest Rear Supports to the back of the Arm Rests with glue and countersunk 1-1/4” screws or brad nails as shown. The Rear Supports should extend 3/4” beyond the side of the Arm Rest. 

Arm Rests for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Modern Adirondack Chair
Step 10

Attach the Arm Rests to the Front Legs and to the Backrest (via the Arm Rest Rear Supports) as shown with glue and pocket screws, countersunk 1-1/4” screws or brad nails. 

Arm Rest for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Modern Adirondack Chair
Step 11

Attach the Arm Rest Front Supports to the Front Legs and Arm Rest as shown with glue and countersunk 1-1/4” screws or brad nails. 

Front Arm Support for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Modern Adirondack Chair
Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

Disclaimer

// Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you ONLY use 1 image and provide an ADEQUATE link back to the original source and appropriate plan! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it. // Post May Contain Affiliate Links

Jul
24
2014
Reader Showcase // Kenwood Cabin Bunk Beds

Built these from plans found on The Design Confidential. Changed a few things but the plans were great! Thank you! 

Jul
19
2014
Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a Dawson Large Desk
Project Details

By special reader request, these fabulous Free DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Dawson Large Desk and perfect for those of you who need a wide solid work surface! I can see this in so many different and gorgeous finishes and with the flip of a drawer pull, this beauty will transform from rustic to vintage and even to modern! Can't wait to see what you do! Xx... Rayan

Showcase: Built From These PlansI am so honored each and every time one of you fine friends builds from these very plans! If you have built this piece, please take a moment and showcase your build! We are dying to see your fabulous hard work!

Dimensions
Tools
Lumber
  • 1 – 1x2 at 4’
  • 4 – 1x3 at 8’
  • 1 – 1x4 at 6’
  • 3 – 2x4 at 8’
  • 2 – 4x4 posts at 6’
  • 3 sheets of ¾” plywood
Materials
Cut List
  • 4 – 4x4 posts at 30-3/4” – Legs
  • 2 – 2x4 at 19-1/2” – Side Frames
  • 2 – ¾” plywood at 17-3/4” x 19-1/2” – Side Panels
  • 2 – 1x2 at 19-1/2” –Upper Side Drawer Spacers
  • 2 – 1x3 at 19-1/2” – Lower Side Drawer Spacers
  • 1 – ¾” plywood at 20-3/4” x 61” – Back
  • 1 – 2x4 at 61” – Lower Stretcher
  • 2 – 2x4 at 15” – Lower Drawer Frame Side
  • 2 – 2x4 at 17” – Lower Drawer Frame Bottom
  • 2 – 2x4 at 3-1/2” – Upper Drawer Dividers
  • 1 – 1x4 at 61” – Upper Stretcher
  • 2 – 1x3 at 22-1/4” – Inner Drawer Spacers
  • 2 – 2x2 at 22-1/4” – Inner Panel Frame
  • 2 – ¾” plywood at 16-1/2” x 22-1/4” – Inner Panels
  • 1 – ¾” plywood at 26-1/2” x 68” – Top
  • 2 – ¾” plywood at 14-1/2” x 22-1/2” – Large Drawer Box Bottoms
  • 4 – ¾” plywood at 11-1/2” x 22-1/2” – Large Drawer Box Sides
  • 4 – ¾” plywood at 11-1/2” x 16” – Large Drawer Front & Back
  • 2 – ¾” plywood at 14-1/2” x 22-1/2” – Smaller Drawer Box Bottoms
  • 4 – 1x3 at 22-1/2” – Smaller Drawer Box Sides
  • 4 – 1x3 at 16” – Smaller Drawer Box Front & Back
  • 1 – ¾” plywood at 21-1/2” x 22-1/2” – Center Drawer Box Bottom
  • 2 – 1x3 at 22-1/2” – Center Drawer Box Sides
  • 2 – 1x3 at 23” – Center Drawer Box Front & Back
  • 2 – ¾” plywood at 13-1/4” x 16-3/4” – Large Drawer Fronts
  • 2 – ¾” plywood at 3-1/4” x 16-3/4” – Smaller Drawer Fronts
  • 1 – ¾” plywood at 3-1/4” x 23-3/4” – Center Drawer Front
Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1

Edge banding will be applied to the exposed edges of the plywood prior to assembly.

Cut the pieces for the legs, the side frames, and the side panels. Set the Kreg jig for 1-1/2” material and drill pocket holes in each end of the frame pieces. Attach to the legs using glue and 2-1/2” pocket hole screws. Orient the pocket holes on the top frame piece so they face up, and the pocket holes on the lower frame piece will face down. This way, they will be hidden and won’t have to be filled.

Set the Kreg jig for ¾” material and drill pocket holes in all four edges of the panels. Secure the panels to the legs and the side frames using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws. The front face of the panels will be located 1” back from the outside face of the legs.

Cut the pieces for the upper and lower drawer spacers, and drill pocket holes in each end. Secure to the legs as shown using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws. The back face of the spacers (the side with the pocket holes) will be flush with the inside of the legs.

Desk Sides for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a Dawson Large Desk
Desk Side Drawer Spacers for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a Dawson Large Desk
Step 2

 Cut the piece for the back and drill pocket holes in each shorter edge. Secure to the legs using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws. The outside face will be flush with the back face of the legs.

Desk Back for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a Dawson Large Desk
Step 3

Cut the 2x4 piece for the lower stretcher. Set the Kreg jig for 1-1/2” material and drill pocket holes in each end. Secure to the legs as shown using glue and 2-1/2” pocket hole screws.

Cut the pieces for the lower drawer frames. Drill pocket holes in the upper end only of the 15” pieces, and both ends of the 17” pieces.  Assemble the pieces in an “L” shape (as shown) using glue and 2-1/2” pocket hole screws. Secure the assemblies to the legs and the lower stretcher using glue and 2-1/2” pocket hole screws.

Lower Stretcher for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a Dawson Large Desk
Lower Drawer Frame for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a Dawson Large Desk
Step 4

Cut the pieces for the drawer dividers and drill pocket holes in one end only. Secure to the top of the lower stretcher using glue and 2-1/2” pocket hole screws.

Cut the 1x4 piece for the upper stretcher. Set the Kreg jig for ¾” material and drill pocket holes in each end. Secure to the legs using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws. Use a few 1-1/4” brad nails through the upper stretcher into the top of the drawer dividers to further secure them in place.

Upper Drawer Dividers for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a Dawson Large Desk
Upper Stretcher for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a Dawson Large Desk
Step 5

 Cut the 1x4 pieces for the inner drawer spacers and drill pocket holes at each end. Secure to the vertical lower frame pieces and back as shown using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws. The spacer pieces should be flush with the inside face of the vertical pieces to allow for the inner sides to be positioned.

Cut the pieces for the inner panels and 2x2 frame piece. Drill pocket holes in the top and side edges of the panel. Set the Kreg jig for 1-1/2” material and drill pocket holes in one end only of the 2x2 inner frame piece.

Secure the panel to the frame piece using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws. The outside face of the panel (without pocket holes) will be flush with the outside face of the 2x2. There will be a left and a right – the pocket holes in the 2x2 pieces will face opposite directions to secure to the vertical lower drawer frame piece.

Secure the inner panel assembly to the back and the vertical lower drawer frame piece. Use glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws through the inner panel, and 2-1/2” pocket hole screws through the 2x2 frame piece. Use a few 1-1/4” brad nails through the back into the back end of the 2x2 frame piece. 

Inner Drawer Spacers for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a Dawson Large Desk
Inner Panels with Pocket Holes from Kreg Jig for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a Dawson Large Desk
Installing Inner Panels using Kreg Jig Pocket Hole Screws for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a Dawson Large Desk
Step 6

Cut the piece for the top. Secure the top to the desk frame using glue and 1-1/4” brad nails through the top. 

Fastening the Top in Place with a Nail Gun for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a Dawson Large Desk
Step 7

Cut the pieces for the drawer boxes. Drill pocket holes in all four edges of the bottom as well as each end of the sides. Assemble the drawer boxes as shown using glue and 1-1/4” pocket hole screws. Install the drawer slides according to the manufacturer’s installation instructions, locating them ¾” back from the front edge of the sides.

Center Drawer Bottom and Sides for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a Dawson Large Desk
Center Drawer Front and Back for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a Dawson Large Desk
Large Drawer Bottom and Sides for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a Dawson Large Desk
Large Drawer Front and Back for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a Dawson Large Desk
Small Drawer Bottom and Sides for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a Dawson Large Desk
Small Drawer Front and Back for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a Dawson Large Desk
Step 8

Cut the pieces for the drawer fronts. Mark the position for the drawer pulls and drill the holes. Shim the drawer front in the opening – there will be a 1/8” gap around all sides – then drive screws through the holes for the drawer pulls into the drawer box. Open the drawer, and secure the drawer front using countersunk 1-1/4” screws from the inside. Remove the screws from the holes for the drawer pull then finish drilling the holes. Install the drawer pull.

Drawer Fronts for Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a Dawson Large Desk
Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

Disclaimer

// Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you ONLY use 1 image and provide an ADEQUATE link back to the original source and appropriate plan! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it. // Post May Contain Affiliate Links

May
13
2014
How to Turn a Mesquite Branch into a Box

My neighbor brings to me from his ranch near Sinton, Texas, mesquite tree limbs and roots he finds on the ground, as well as really old (50+ years) cedar fence posts to see what I can do with them.  Candle holders are a favorite but I also like to cut the timber into lumber that I can use to build boxes.  The Showcase photo is made from one such Mesquite tree limb.  I encourage everyone to try this with their favorite tree after it loses a limb.  I learned recently that there is an Ebony tree that grows wild in South Texas.  I look forward to giving that wood a try very soon.

First I cut the limb up into strips of lumber about 1/2" or 1/4" in thickness.  Then I select which piece will be used for the sides, ends, bottom and top.  The top and bottom have to less than 1/4" in thickness as they will slide through channels I rout with a 1/4" straight bit on the sides and ends.  The sides and ends thickness' just have to approximate each other.  All have to be square and flat which is where I spend hours sanding and cutting.  This is my justification for a planer for Father's day.

Once you have all of the pieces the way you want them just glue them up and finish.

The final result is the well-known Pencil Box....

 

How to Make a Box from a Mesquite Branch
Estimated Cost 

Mostly sandpaper, glue, and oil.  Maybe $5
 

Length of Time 

I would say I spent two hours a day for a week.  I could do it in half that time if I just would not offer myself so many alternatives.

Lumber Used 

Mesquite

Finishing Technique 

Lots of sanding.  Inside I sanded to 120 grit and the outside 320 grit.  After sanding two applications of Danish oil and then once the oil was dry a nice coat of Johnson paste wax.

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