Aug
26
2016
The Design Confidential x AVE Home // DIY In The Clear Oil Finish Butler Tray

For my third and final installment with the AVE Raw line from Ave Home, I really wanted to celebrate the beauty of the piece by leaving it in all it's Raw and beautiful glory. But... let's be real - I have two boys, dogs, a husband and a couple of frogs and all of them specialize in making messes and breaking things. Some sort of protective finish was a must, but many layers of wax and buffing or a true oil finish that would alter the color of the wood or give it an unnatural shine were quite the opposite of what I had in mind.

I am over the moon excited to share this project with you fine folks, because it is truly the first and only finish I have ever done that was actually clear and didn't alter the original look of the wood at all. No added sheen or shine, no hours of labor intensive applications of varnish or wax. Just pure and simple - a gorgeous oil based finish in the convenience of a spray.

The Design Confidential x AVE Home // DIY In The Clear Oil Finish Butler Tray

Let's talk about the piece for a minute, shall we? This fine piece of work is the Audrey Butler Tray + Brass Stand and it could be the poster child for all the beautiful things. It is much larger than I imagined it would be, which opens it up for more amazing uses that I hadn't even thought to use it for. I have been slowly attempting to add lighter tones of wood throughout my family room and kitchen area so this piece is now replacing a darker vintage piece I formerly had in this spot. It is a far better height and width and the brass stand is mighty handsome too, giving it just a bit of that something extra. It is perfect and it arrived in a perfect state with absolutely no need to sand or condition it prior to finishing. 

Wholesale online orders will be open through the end of the month, and beginning September 1st, you will be able to order the pieces in the Raw line through your local dealer. Of course if you don't have a dealer near you, you can contact the lovely folks at Ave Home for a special order!

The Design Confidential x AVE Home // DIY In The Clear Oil Finish Butler Tray

An oil finish is timeless and durable. Most of the time an oil finish demands much more of you than this particular product did and all that beauty often comes at a price if altering the color is not your goal. An oil will soak down into the pores of the wood and will provide a marvelous water resistance and protective durability. This good looking oil I used here, could not be easier if it tried. I used a spray water proofing product that is clear and gave this piece two light coats and done. There really wasn't much else to it.

The Design Confidential x AVE Home // DIY In The Clear Oil Finish Butler Tray

The most difficult part of the application is that you actually need to spray a light coat. I hope that you can see above just how lightly this can be sprayed. If you are like me, this is the hardest thing ever because my perfectionist nature wants to have each and every coat have perfect coverage. Luckily it won't be the end of the world if you accidentally spray more on than you should have. It will pool and it may even drip or run, but it matters not, just use a brush or a smooth cloth rag and wipe away excess. Let it cure and dry for at least 24 hours before you bring your furniture inside and be sure to wear a respirator and eye protection. This is a product that should be applied outside, just be sure to protect your plants.

MATERIALS //

The Design Confidential x AVE Home // DIY In The Clear Oil Finish Butler Tray

Once you have addressed any excess and allowed for the finish to dry, you won't be able to tell you applied anything at all except that your wood will be happy and water will bead if it is spilled on the surface.

The Design Confidential x AVE Home // DIY In The Clear Oil Finish Butler Tray

The finish and this piece are truly dreamy and a clear oil based finish was perfect way to show off the natural beauty of this butler tray and the craftsmanship that went into it. It lives on a little wall that is a straight shot down a long hallway and can be seen almost instantly when you enter my home. It was an honor to put my mark on it and I love seeing this little vignette every time I walk in the front door.

Note

This project was created in partnership with Ave Home. All crazy talk and opinions are 100% my own. 

Aug
11
2016
You Can Build This! The Design Confidential DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Slatted Coffee Table

Introducing the Outdoor Slat Coffee Table - the third piece in our new outdoor collection. Not only is it beautiful, but it has tons of storage and the table top features nifty removeable panels. The perfect place to set your drink and store all of the messy kid toys out of sight, so you can actually enjoy said drink a little more fully. Win, win!

As with all of our plans, you are building at your own risk and you should have a firm understanding of building in general before you attempt many of our plans (some are easy as pie and perfect for beginners). With that, go forth, have fun, take lots of pictures and share them in a showcase on the site or on social media with the hashtag #builtTDCtuff and we will share our faves! Be sure to tag @thedesignconfidential on Instagram / FB and @thedesconf on Twitter / Pinterest. Don't forget... for all of our newer plans, clicking on the images will let them expand to enormous sizes with much greater clarity. The older plans may need updating so please let us know if you need one fixed!

Showcase: Built From These PlansI am so honored each and every time one of you fine friends builds from these very plans! If you have built this piece, please take a moment and showcase your build! We are dying to see your fabulous hard work!

Estimated Cost
$75-$125
Dimensions
You Can Build This! The Design Confidential DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Slatted Coffee Table
Tools

SHOP THIS PROJECT //

Lumber
  • 18 – 1x2 at 8’       
  • 5 – 2x2 at 8’
  • 3/4” plywood at 2’ x 4’ 
Materials
Cut List
  • 4 – 2x2 at 15” – Legs
  • 4 – 2x2 at 23-1/4” – End Tops/Bottoms
  • 12 – 1x2 at 23-1/4” – End Slats
  • 4 – 2x2 at 44-1/4” – Front/Back Tops/Bottoms
  • 12 – 1x2 at 44-1/4” – Front/Back Slats
  • 3/4” plywood at 23-1/4” x 44-1/4” – Table Bottom
  • 2 – 2x2 at 2” – Table Bottom Supports
  • 2 – 1x2 at 10-3/4” – Front/Back Slat Supports
  • 1 – 2x2 at 23-1/4” – Long Table Top Support
  • 2 – 2x2 at 21-3/8” – Short Table Top Supports
  • 8 – 1x2 at 13-3/4” – Table Top Short Frames
  • 8 – 1x2 at 21-1/4” – Table Top Long Frames
  • 24 – 1x2 at 21-1/4” – Table Top Slats
  • 8 – 1x2 at 10-5/8” – Table Top Insets
Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1
You Can Build This! The Design Confidential DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Slatted Coffee Table

Cut the pieces for the Legs and the End Tops/Bottoms. With the Kreg jig set for 1-1/2” material, drill pocket holes in both ends of the End Tops/Bottoms. Assemble as shown with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws. Face the pocket holes to the inside of the table so that they are hidden once the table is assembled. This step should be completed twice.

Step 2
You Can Build This! The Design Confidential DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Slatted Coffee Table

Cut the pieces for the End Slats. With the Kreg jig set for 3/4” material, drill pocket holes in both ends of the End Slats. Place the End Slats to where they are flush with the outside edge of the Legs and spaced 1/4” from each other. Assemble as shown with glue and 1-1/4” pocket screws.

Step 3
You Can Build This! The Design Confidential DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Slatted Coffee Table

Cut the pieces for the Front/Back Tops/Bottoms. With the Kreg jig set for 1-1/2” material, drill pocket holes in both ends of the Front/Back Tops/Bottoms. Assemble as shown with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws. Face the pocket holes to the inside of the table so that they are hidden once the table is assembled.

Step 4
You Can Build This! The Design Confidential DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Slatted Coffee Table

Cut the pieces for the Front/Back Slats. With the Kreg jig set for 3/4” material, drill pocket holes in both ends of the Front/Back Slats. Place the Front/Back Slats to where they are flush with the outside edge of the Legs and spaced 1/4” from each other. Assemble as shown with glue and 1-1/4” pocket screws.

Step 5
You Can Build This! The Design Confidential DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Slatted Coffee Table

Cut the piece for the Table Bottom. With the Kreg jig set for 3/4” material, drill pocket holes along all sides of the Table Bottom. Place the Table Bottom to where it is flush with the top edge of the Front/Back Bottoms and End Bottoms. Assemble as shown with glue and 1-1/4” pocket screws.

Step 6
You Can Build This! The Design Confidential DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Slatted Coffee Table

Cut the pieces for the Table Bottom Supports. Position the Table Bottom Supports as shown and secure into place with glue and 2-1/2” wood screws – start the screws from the inside of the Coffee Table, through the Table Bottom, and into the Table Bottom Supports.

Step 7
You Can Build This! The Design Confidential DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Slatted Coffee Table

Cut the pieces for the Front/Back Slat Supports. With the Kreg jig set for 3/4” material, drill pocket holes in both ends of the Front/Back Slat Supports. Assemble as shown with glue and 1-1/4” pocket screws. Face the pocket holes to the inside of the table. Insert 1-1/4” wood screws into the Front/Back Slats to attach them to the Front/Back Slat Supports.

Step 8
You Can Build This! The Design Confidential DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Slatted Coffee Table

Cut the piece for the Long Table Top Support. With the Kreg jig set for 1-1/2” material, drill pocket holes in both ends of the Long Table Top Support. Assemble as shown with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws.

Step 9
You Can Build This! The Design Confidential DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Slatted Coffee Table

Cut the pieces for the Short Table Top Supports. With the Kreg jig set for 1-1/2” material, drill pocket holes in both ends of the Short Table Top Supports. Assemble as shown with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws.

Step 10
You Can Build This! The Design Confidential DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Slatted Coffee Table

Cut the pieces for the Table Top Short Frames and the Table Top Long Frames. With the Kreg jig set for 3/4” material, drill pocket holes in both ends of the Table Top Long Frames. Attach to the Table Top Short Frames as shown with glue and 1-1/4” pocket screws. Repeat this step 4 times.

Step 11

Cut the pieces for the Table Top Slats. With the Kreg jig set for 3/4” material, drill pocket holes in both ends of the Table Top Slats. Place the Table Top Slats to where they are flush with the Frame pieces and spaced 1/4” from each other. Attach to the Frame pieces as shown with glue and 1-1/4” pocket screws.

You Can Build This! The Design Confidential DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Slatted Coffee Table
Step 12
You Can Build This! The Design Confidential DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Slatted Coffee Table
You Can Build This! The Design Confidential DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build an Outdoor Slatted Coffee Table

Cut the pieces for the Table Top Insets. Attach the Table Top Inset pieces to the Table Top “Panels” as shown with glue and 1-1/4” brad nails.  This step should be repeated a total of 4 times. When set in place, the Table Top Panels will each have a 3/4” overhang past the outer edges of the Coffee Table and will have a 1/4” internal gap between each Panel.

Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

Disclaimer

// Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you ONLY use 1 image and provide an ADEQUATE link back to the original source and appropriate plan! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential. By accessing or using any part of the web site, you agree to become bound by the terms and conditions of this website as outlined under Terms of Use. If you do not agree to all the terms and conditions of this agreement, then you may not access the Website or use any services. The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by The Design Confidential.com and while we endeavor to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, personal injury or death, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of information or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of this website. I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it. The Design Confidential.com is inspired by but does not replicate exact designs, any similarities between these plans and items sold at specialty retailers is coincidential and not endorsed by or related to any said retailers. // Post May Contain Affiliate Links

Jul
12
2016

We are back with our second installment in the AVE Raw series, giving a gorgeous set of pieces from Ave Home a fab new finish and sharing all the details along the way! As a group of like minded people, we certainly have use of a good furniture finish more than the average Joe. I am particularly excited about this project because it may very well be the easiest solution for a durable paint finish that sprays, yet doesn't require expensive equipment to apply and isn't difficult to work with or clean up. In fact, I can't believe this didn't occur to me earlier. 

I chose the Mollie Nesting Tables and they did not disappoint. Nesting tables are the ultimate multi-purpose tables, in my opinion. Use them as a chic end table, an accent table with extra display space or separate and scatter them about, you have 3 tables to work with, so go crazy. 

The unfinished state the pieces from the AVE Raw collection arrive with is flawless. This is not an exaggeration. My thought is that if you are planning a finish that typically requires an immaculate sanding prior to application - you would be well suited to leave it well enough alone because it will be exactly that when it lands on your doorstep. If you plan to stain, then a good cleaning with a special thinner would be a great idea. It will remove any oils or dirt that occur during transit and packing, but otherwise - don't touch with a sander as you run the risk of having any irregularities show once the stain has been applied.

That being said, a paint finish is an entirely different animal. The one thing you will experience regardless, is that when you apply a finish to a raw wood surface, it will open the pores of your wood and may cause that slightly rough textured appearance until you give it another coat of paint or a sealant. Many product lines suggest a light sanding in between coats and this is to solve for that and to help your second coat adhere to the first. But what about those products that do not want you to sand in between? Well no worries, another coat or two usually does the trick. This was certainly the case for the finish I used on these gorgeous nesting tables.

I think we are all in agreement that an oil based finish is going to be far more durable than one that isn't. But applying an oil based finish with a natural brush is no walk in the park. If you must go the way of applying your finish with a brush - switch to a roller with an ultra smooth nap and pretend you didn't that portion of the instructions. Trust me on this. No amount of self-leveling properties the paint may have will actually solve for the brush marks and that doesn't even take into account the cleanup. Enamel paints aren't typically the most user friendly if you aren't a pro in the finishing industry. I knew I needed the durability of a true enamel oil based finish for these tables, so I set out to find an easy solution for this and stumbled upon spray cans of oil based automotive paint. Duh. How did this never occur to me? It was the ultimate face-palm moment and once I set my sights on the color and sheen I was looking for, I was chomping at the bit for my paint to arrive. 

I used a matte black enamel automotive spray paint, and it is the most glorious finish you have ever laid eyes on, that wasn't done in a professional setting. I always start a spray finish on the bottom, with my piece turned upsidedown.

This particular type of paint suggests a mere 15 minutes in between coats, which is fantastic since that is approximately the same amount of time I normally wait regardless of the suggestions on the can. I will chalk that up to my lack of patience. I continued to spray very light coats on the bottom sides until they appeared to be fully covered and the finish looked solid. If you have ever worked with an oil based paint, you will know what I mean by solid... hardened might also be a good word to describe what I mean. I let the finish cure for about 45 minutes before I turned the tables right side up and began the coat the top and any nooks and crannies that aren't accessible from the bottom. I used 5 cans of paint to finish the three tables and they are glorious. I always use a spray can trigger when I am working with spray paint and it helps with fatigue - which allows for a smoother finish in the end. 

It is always recommended that you use a primer on raw wood, but I did not and it is flawless. I would definitely suggest you do though, since it will likely solve for the open pores and help with adhesion - making your finish more durable and lasting. A primer is always the way to go if you have the option and in the case of automotive enamel... you do have the option! Since these are oil based products, you will definitely need to work in a well ventalated space, and preferably outside. No amount of venting for a standard space will actually help so get outside and get yourself a good respirator mask and you will be set!

The thing about a matte finish is that it's a bit hard to capture on film. It doesn't play nicely with the light and tends to refract it, so you will have to take my word for it when I say that it is indeed glorious and smooth like glass. Of course this is entirely, due in part (you like what I did there?) to how pristine the pieces are from the AVE Raw collection from Ave Home. Major heart eyes for everything in their online shop. Lucky for all of you fine folks - if you use the code DESIGNCONF at checkout you will get an amazing 20% discount for the next 2 weeks, on what I consider already fantastic prices... so if you are on the fence - run, don't walk and plop yourself in front of your computer or grab your phone and get to clicking! You will be so happy you did! 

Pages

drupal counter