Jul
10
2014
Sneak Peak of Home Depot Style Challenge for Outdoor Games

I know I have been a horrible, no good, downright rotten blogger for the past few weeks, but life is kicking me in the pants these days. Aside from my little seesters wedding, which is tomorrow (yahoo), and all of the duties that come with that, I have had some rather major projects going on behind the scenes here at the House of TDC.

Materials for Sneak Peak of Home Depot Style Challenge for Outdoor Games

Likewise, this gal loves a good set of DIY supplies. How about these pretties? I won't let the cat out of the bag on what these gorgeous materials are actually for, but I am a sucker for the amazing aisles of 'stuff' at Home Depot that I can imagine as becoming something great. Hopefully you guys share my nerdy love for all things home improvement store related because I know for sure you will share my love for what these babies become. So so good! Promise! 

In the meantime, I have quite a few other fun things to share with you and I will be back shortly to do exactly that! Yahoo! 

 

Living 
Oct
12
2013
Project Image

So... I installed crown molding in my home office this week... and it was the hardest and most frustrating experience I have had in a very long time... and I loved it! I'm quite literally covered in bruises and I have many a horror story to tell about the process. The good news is... it looks amazing (beauty is sacrifice, am I right?) and I lived to tell about it.

To complete this project, you will need all of the materials shown above in addition to a compound miter saw. You can also use any number of crown molding jigs if you do prefer, but again, this tutorial will focus on crown molding installation as the 'pros' tend to do it. Those 'pros', they know a thing or two...

Materials:

  • Safety Gear - eye, ear, respiratory protection
  • Ladder
  • Compound Miter Saw (one that miters and bevels)
  • Nail Gun
  • Coping Saw
  • Tape Measure
  • Framing Square or Carpenters Square (my personal preference for this project) - optional but helpful
  • Angle Finder
  • Molding -in a style of your choice (I chose molding that is already finished to save time and energy on this project. It costs a bit more, but it was worth it to me!)
  • Caulk or Touch Up (or both)
  • Blue Painters Tape or a Scrap Piece of Lumber (1x2) - optional but helpful
  • Pencil

I find it extremely helpful to keep my supplies in an easy access bucket when I am up and down the ladder every few minutes. Keeps me light on my feet and organized! 

​Overview:

We will work this project beginning with one piece that will be squared off on both ends and will be installed on the wall opposite the door, preferably. Then you have the option of doing the same for the opposite wall (to this first wall) and then making fancy corners for both edges of the two remaining boards (Installation Option 1).

OR

You can do what the pro's tend to do and work in a pattern with the second piece of molding for the adjacent wall (to the first) that will have one squared edge and one fancy edge, then do the same for the 3rd wall adjacent to that (and opposite the first wall), and for the 4th wall you will make both edges fancy (Installation Option 2).

This is entirely up to you and won't make much of a difference except that you will only cut left inside corners for the 2nd and 3rd pieces in the second option above and will cut both corners on the last board, whereas in the first option above you will only cut fancy edges on 2 of the boards and you will do both edges for those. Regardless you will make a total of 4 fancy schmancy cuts.

 

Let's get down to business. You should absolutely measure and mark out the location of where your molding should sit, on all 4 of your walls. If you install even an 1/8" lower or higher than you should it will throw off your angles substantially. This is where I like to use a framing square, because for me it gives me a more accurate measurement. I simply slide it along the ceiling line and mark at my measurement. I get crazy with a tape measure sometimes and my dimensions aren't always accurate especially when I'm working in the very tiny fractional measurements. 

When I am working alone (or even when I'm not) I find it extremely helpful to install a support board just under where my molding will sit. This provides me a bit of extra help in holding my molding in place and also keeps me working at exactly the right measurement, all along the wall. You can also use Blue Painter's Tape to give yourself a proper, and very visual, demarcation if you prefer. It works beautifully and will keep you from having to erase or paint over all of those crazy pencil marks! 

Measure out the length of your longest wall or the wall opposite your door, and cut a piece of crown molding to fit. For this first piece, both ends will be squared off and cut at 90° (or a 0° angle on your saw) while the molding rests flat on your saw (on flat). 

Find the studs along this wall and be sure to attach your molding to the studs at every opportunity possible. You may also feel the need to secure in between the studs, but attaching to the stud's will ensure that your molding won't come crashing down at any given moment (hopefully).

Attach using your nail gun, and place your finish nails or brad nails along the top and bottom of your molding. 

This is the only piece you will install that will have 2 squared off edges if you choose the second installation option above, and if you choose the first installation option, do this exact same series of steps for the wall opposite this first wall, before you continue on. 

When you are ready to continue on to a piece that requires some fancy cutting, you will need to determine which type of corner you are working with before you can start cutting. This step is somewhat crucial and can get confusing along the way, so pay close attention.

The type of corner is always determined when viewing from the corner view like you see above. In other words, when you are looking at the corner itself.  I will show you below how this gets a tad crazy from the 'wall view' in the next step, so just remember each and every corner is it's own entity and the particular cut you will make is determined by looking at the corner itself! 

From this view (seen above), this is a fairly logical step. The left side is the left inside corner and the right side is the right inside corner. Determining the left versus the right here is easy to peg since they do in fact fall on the appropriate sides, and they are all considered inside corners if they are corners in a standard 4 walled room that doesn't have any pop outs or carve outs. Easy peasy, right? No matter which corner you are looking at, it will follow this pattern. No matter what! 

But... things get a tad crazy when you are facing the wall because then your corner types are in fact opposite. As you can see above, the left side of the molding will actually need to be cut as a right inside corner since that is which side of the corner it resides on, while the right side of your molding will need to be cut as a left inside corner... again since that is which side of the corner it happens to reside on. If you don't label your board appropriately, it's easy to forget which is which when you are cutting. So before you head out to your saw, mark your molding properly with the right side of the molding labeled as a left inside corner and the left side marked as a right inside corner. Your pencil is your friend here. Trust me on that! 

The image above shows you approximately how your cuts will look depending on which side you are cutting, or if you are cutting both sides for example. I am showing you this because again it tends to be a bit counterintuitive to how you might think your cuts should look when you are mitering two corners together, but it all works properly, I promise. 

Once you have labeled your side with the proper corner type, you will need to find your spring angle. This is the other crucial step in this project because in combination with the angle of your wall, at the corner in question, the spring angle will help determine the angle you miter and bevel at. Very important indeed. 

To find your molding spring angle you will need to use your angle finder tool (link in materials above) set along that portion of your molding as shown by the yellow line above. Your angle finder tool will likely come with directions and pictures, but just in case I am showing you where it needs to sit in order to take the measurement properly. Molding comes in a variety of spring angle varieties, but the most common tend to be 38° and 45° so we will work with those spring angle options here. 

Using the same tool, measure the true angle of your wall at the corner you are working on. While we all like to believe our home is perfection, it's very likely you may have a corner or two that are off a tiny bit and might actually be closer to 88° or 91°. These slight discrepancies will make a big difference to the fit of your molding so find your true measurements before you cut. 

I have created a chart for you below, for both 38° and 45° spring angles and wall angles ranging from 70° to 110°. Just find your numbers and go forth in bliss...

If you have a different spring angle for your molding you will need to find a crown molding angle finder app or tool on the web to help you calculate your proper miter and bevel angles. I used the Crown Molding Angle Finder App for iPhone and it worked beautifully! If you prefer to calculate on your computer or via the web, this tool is fabulous! 

My molding had a 38° spring angle and my walls did in fact have 90° angles (who knew?) so I was working with a 31.62° miter angle and a 33.86° bevel, which funny enough had marked indicators on my miter saw (thank you Ryobi). That made me feel like I was clearly on the right track! It's the little things, no?

Once you have your miter and bevel angles determined, it's time to set your saw and molding up for a proper cut!

The image above shows the setup for a left inside corner cut. Your miter angle will be to the right and your bevel to the left with the top of your molding against your saw fence and your molding laying flat. You will be keeping the material to the left of your cut.

For a right inside corner cut, the image above shows your proper setup. You will set your miter angle to the left this time and you will flip your molding so the bottom edge rests against the saw fence. Your bevel will sit to the left and you will be keeping the material to the left of your cut, just as with the left inside corner cut previously.

For my process, regardless of whether I am only making one fancy edge or two, I prefer to miter and bevel both edges or miter and bevel one edge and square the other, then check for proper fit before I begin the coping. Coping is a tad exhausting and so I would rather adjust for length and fit before I take the plunge and then have to redo it if the fit is off. 

When you are measuring for length on pieces that will be for the other walls aside from the first wall, I find it helpful to measure both the short and long length, just to give me a guide. The dimension you will definitely need is from the bottom of the molding you have already installed to the opposite edge of the wall or to the bottom edge of the molding on the opposite wall (depending on your installation option). Basically bottom edge to bottom edge since that will be your long length, so to speak (to get a visual of this, refer to the step above with the direction of the cuts diagram). 

If your general length fit is fabulous you can cope to remove material for an even more perfect fit. I find it easiest to mark along the curvy edge of the molding as a bit of a cutting guide. You will essentially use your coping saw to carve away material from the back side of that edge. You will want to carve along that edge as precisely as possible and remove, quite literally, as much of the material behind it as you can. The more you remove, the better and more precise your fit. You can see above what it will look like from behind. You may also need to square off your bottom edge for a nice tight fit. 

Check your fit again, this time to see if you have removed enough material from behind or if you need to remove a tad more.

Install your remaining pieces with your nail gun, just as you did your first piece, by placing your finish nails in all of the studs as well as in between, along both the top and bottom of your molding. Once your molding is in place you can begin your finish work! Use your caulking to fill in the corner seams, along the top and bottom edges where your molding meets the walls, and in all your nail holes. Your installation will appear flawless, even if like mine, it wasn't... Caulk is the magic eraser of the crown molding world, and your very good friend. Use it to your advantage. 

Tip: Overfill along any seams or holes and allow your caulking to sit for a minute. Then use a diaper wipe or a moist paper towel around your finger to wipe away excess with wonderfully accurate precision. Repeat if necessary to build up your layer of caulking and fill in areas that need that little bit of extra help!

Yahoo... congratulations you have just finished installing beautiful crown molding... If you need to paint, paint away, and if you chose the material I did that is already finished, then double yahoo to you!

I couldn't be happier with my outcome, regardless of how I got there (which was definitely the long way around the block). Now I will be onto the next projects in this space, the first of which should probably be some trim around the windows to match! Also I could use a bit of greenery outside the windows to beef up the view... So much to do, so little time... I hope you all enjoyed this and I will see you back here this week for some other fun projects I have done recently! Xx...Rayan

Note

Disclosure: This project was completed in partnership with The Home Depot as part of the #LetsDoThis campaign. I received compensation from them to complete this fabulous tutorial, for your enjoyment and entertainment! All musings, bruises and adventures are 100% my own! 

May
30
2013
Project Image

This project was hard. The End. But this portion I am sharing with you today, was not hard. This version is simple and you can finish this project in a day which will be mainly dry time. It turned out so fabulously that I am fairly certain I will repeat it a few more times! Next time it will be so much easier to do, since I feel like I truly figured out the process this go around, and perfected it. Now you guys can do this too and can skip the 17 versions I completed that didn't work, not even a little bit... yay for that!

Materials:

  • ScotchBlue™ Painter's Tape
  • Concrete Resurfacer 
  • Universal Mixer Attachment for your Drill
  • Bucket
  • Masonry Brush
  • Trowel 
  • 12" Concrete Tube Form at 48"
  • Paint in a color of your choice
  • Water Seal (optional)
  • Jig Saw or Circular Saw
  • Large Drill Bit
  • 3/4" plywood at 24"x24"
  • 3/4" self tapping screws

I taped off my concrete tube form using ScotchBlue™ Painter's Tape at the 20" mark, from either end, so that I would have an easy to see guide for my table height. Then using a large drill bit, I drill pilot holes close to my tape lines so that I could start my jig saw with ease. Simply cut around the tape line on both sides to cut your form to size using a jig saw (easiest for me) or a circular saw if you prefer.

I traced around the inside of my concrete tube form to set my table top size appropriately, and then cut them out using my jig saw. 

I used self tapping screws to attach my top to the form sitting just inside the lip of the form. 

Mix your concrete resurfacer with water according to the instructions on the package. Use your handy dandy mixer attachment on a very low and slow speed to mix your material. You want to end up with a consistency that is something like really thick pancake batter for this to work how it should.

 

DIY 

Use your Masonry Brush and paint on a thin layer of the concrete resurfacer. Once you have covered the base, use your trowel to cover the top (this is much easier than trying to use the brush for the top for some reason) and smooth a bit. 

Allow it to dry partially (about 70%) then sand smooth. Be careful not to sand off your thin layer of concrete. If you need to touch up, this is the time to do so while your material is still wet enough. If you want to add a thick layer of concrete, do this in steps with thin layers each time, and work your way up. If you layer too soon you will have that experience of accidentally wiping off your first layer as you attempt to add on to it. 

Allow your tables to completely cure for 24 hours or the recommended time on the package. Once dry you are ready to tape and paint! 

Be sure to choose a paint color with a bit of a sheen to help seal any unfinished edges on the tube form. This will also help the tables weather a bit better. Give the edges and the bottom inch of the underside a very good coat or two of your paint. 

I used a foam brush, since they grab quite a bit of paint, and used a stippling motion (pouncing) since the tables have quite a bit of texture. I worked my way around making sure to hit every single nook and cranny. I only did one coat, but I did a very good thick single coat. 

I like to remove my tape right away but this is a personal preference and not a requirement! For me it helps to know if I have made an error before I put my painting supplies away, so I 'check' my work early...

I would recommend a water seal spray of some sort if you live in a wet climate, just to be sure you don't have exposed cardboard around the bottom. Otherwise enjoy! 

Love, love, love these beauties and they are very light weight too! Easy to pick up and move around but sturdy enough for outdoor use! Though I'm thinking indoor use would be fabulous too. 

See another project from this blog-hop here: Centsational Girl - Textured Panel Dresser Makeover

Now who is ready for that giveaway I promised? You? Awesome! Enter using the form below!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

painter's tape, scotchblue painter's tape, tape

painter's tape, scotchblue painter's tape, tape

This post was brought to you in partnership with The Home Depot and ScotchBlue™ Painter's Tape.

May
22
2013
Project Image

Post and giveaway sponsored by The Home Depot, but all opinions are my own. 

The DIH Workshop at the Stanford Ranch Home Depot was amazing, with an amazing turnout! Yahoo! Everyone was completely into the topic and the whole experience was amazing (Thank you Stanford Ranch Store, I heart you guys!!!)!

We tackled a vertical garden, classic potted garden and even hypertufa... ya be jealous... hypertufa rules! 

 

Now let's get down to business for our DIY project, shall we? 

Materials:

  • 4x6 piece of lumber at 6' or less
  • Spade Bit or Hole Saw at 2"-2 1/2" would be perfect, but smaller will work with multiple holes (see my video below!)
  • large and long drill bit for wood
  • succulents of your choice
  • sandpaper
  • acylic paint of your choice
  • paint brush (I used a 2" brush for this, it went faster that way)

Oky dok, the directions are all included in this short video below. yahoo... 

 

 

 

Oky dok my friends... and now are you ready to get this GIVEAWAY started? One of you lucky ducks will win a $100 Home Depot Gift Card! Yahoo!

Enter using the Rafflecopter form below!

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Kiddos 
Living 
Apr
25
2013
Project Image

Post sponsored by The Home Depot, but all opinions are my own, of course!

Disclosure Language:

The Home Depot partnered with bloggers such as me for their Twitter Party and DIH Workshop program. As part of this program, I received compensation for my time. They did not tell me what to purchase or what to say about any product mentioned in these posts. The Home Depot believes that consumers and bloggers are free to form their own opinions and share them in their own words. The Home Depot’s policies align with WOMMA Ethics Code, FTC guidelines and social media engagement recommendations.

Living 
Jan
31
2013
Project Image

Well the time has come to draw a winner for our fabulous giveaway and announce that most lucky winner! And in fact, the winner has been notified via email and is posted on the giveaway itself, yay! Go see if it's you...

I for one plan to enter my projects there and win me some tools baby! I hope anyway... 

And now for the technical sponsored info just in case... even though it doesn't technically apply to this post! 

  • RYOBI Nation is an online destination for power tool and DIY enthusiasts to share photos of their project successes, vote on their favorite projects for the opportunity to win prizes and have access to special offers on Ryobi power tools.
  • The RYOBI ONE+ system offers more versatility, value and performance for DIYers and pros on a budget. The Home Depot has over 50 Ryobi products that are compatible with the Ryobi ONE+ Lithium Ion battery. Drills, saws, outdoor power tools and other types of tools all use the ONE+ battery.
  • Perfect for any DIYer, the RYOBI18V ONE+ Lithium Ion Compact Drill Kit features the latest in power tool technology. Weighing less than three pounds, the RYOBI One+ Compact Drill Kit is easy for users of any strength or skill level to use.

The Home Depot Disclosure Statement:  The Home Depot partnered with bloggers such as me to help promote their Lithium Ion power tool collection. As part of this promotion, I received compensation for my time. They did not tell me what to purchase or what to say about the products. The Home Depot believes that consumers and bloggers are free to form their own opinions and share them in their own words. The Home Depot’s policies align with WOMMA Ethics Code, FTC guidelines and social media engagement recommendations.

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