Plans

Free Furniture Plans to Build a No Sew Upholstered Louis XVI Chair

10.28.10
Project Image

This plan is my Pièce de résistance, an easy to build version of my most favorite chair and the one I own a variation of, and adore each and everyday. It is also the one that will only cost you around $25 to build, give or take, and for which I paid almost $300 for, per chair!  When you calculate that out by 10 chairs, which is the number I have, just think of the savings…sigh… I am currently building this chair- to a certain extent (for those of you who would like additional pictures of the process to help you along) – I am building the frame, and then using it as a jumping off point for my next most amazing challenge, which is to provide all of you with an easy to construct plan, for a very intricately upholstered chair….WITH NO UPHOLSTERY NEEDED!  I am honestly not 100% sure I can do it.  But, I am going to give it my best try, and I am feeling pretty confident there is a decent chance of my success. It isn’t the chair construction that is difficult, it’s trying to find a way, for folks who don’t sew and don’t have upholstering tools or experience, to construct the chair.  If it has to be sewn, and requires some skill, it is limited and not as user friendly, I’m just not as pleased with that option. Without further ado, this plan and construction is what I have been working on this week, along side my V-Frame Bookshelf (plans for that can be found here), which is primed and ready for color!

Estimated Cost

$25-$50

Tools
  • Tape Measure
  • Square
  • Sander
  • Drill
  • Saw – Jig or Circular
  • Kreg Jig
  • Staple gun
Lumber
  • 1/4 sheet – 1/2” plywood (2’ x 4’ and can be low grade ply )
  • 2 – 2×2 at 8′
  • 1 – 2×4 at 8′
Materials
  • 1″ Pocket Hole Screws
  • 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws
  • Wood Glue
  • Wood Filler
  • Sandpaper
  • Finishing Supplies
  • Staples
  • Batting (chair padding) – about 1″ or so, in thickness
  • Fabric – upholstery weight preferable **For 60” fabric width you will need 1 yard. **Any width less than 60” you will need 1 1/4 yards
Cut List
  • 1 – 1/2″ Ply at 16 3/4” x 15 3/4” (chair back)
  • 1 – 1/2″ Ply at 19″ x 19″ (chair seat)
  • 2 – 2×4 at 40” (Back legs)
  • 2 – 2×2 at 17 1/4” (front legs)
  • 7 – 2×2 at 16” (chair aprons and rails)
Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1
Step 1
Step 1

Cut your 2×4’s in the shape and dimensions indicated below. To begin, draw out the cut lines as you see them here, go slow, and be accurate. You will have the most success cutting this, with either a circular saw or jig saw. A jig saw can cut right along the lines you draw, whereas with a circular saw, you will need to stop at each change of direction and angle, and carve out the triangular piece you began with, before moving on in another direction. You want to be sure both legs match and that the bottom of the legs, and the 3” vertical center (where the seat will connect), line up as perfectly as possible. To ensure matching dimensions and angles, clamp the legs together after you cut them out, and sand the matching faces of both at the same time for all 4 sides. Once they are matching and sanded, connect them with the rail as indicated below. It will sit at the bottom of the 3” vertical space on the legs.. You can sand and finish this section or wait until you attach it to the chair front, but be sure to finish it prior to attaching the seat with it’s upholstery.

Step 2
Step 2
Step 2

Build the front: cut all pieces to size, then place your pocket holes in the areas indicated below. Use your 1 1/2” setting and your 2 1/2” pocket hole screws.

Step 3
Step 3
Step 3

Cut your corner supports and place your pocket holes in an L-shape as indicated below, drill a hole in the center of each support. This hole will be used to attach your seat in a later step. Then attach the chair front to the chair back. Use the back aprons to attach, and secure from the inside as indicated in the bottom image.

Step 4
Step 4

Cut out and then notch your seat bottom. **Do not attach yet, as we will be upholstering it next step. The dimensions are shown below with 1 1/2” squares notched out of the back corners

Step 5
Step 5
Step 5

Cut your batting and fabric to size, and using your staple gun secure to the backside of the seat bottom. Staple them both at the same time, together. Start by stapling in each corner including the corners of your carve outs. Then you will work in a clockwise manner, stapling once per side (in the center of a remaining space) as you go around, continuing on in this manner until the fabric is completely secured. This pattern of stapling ensures that your fabric is not skewed or pulled more tightly on one side and helps you avoid wrinkling and pleating that you didn’t intend for. You will likely have a tiny bit of overlapping fabric in corners, but if you work in this manner, by stapling the corner then folding over the remaining corner fabric and stapling it, you can control the folding and make it appear nice looking.

Step 6
Step 6
Step 6

Cut your rails and panel insert to size, then create your pocket holes for them. **Do not attach yet, only create your pocket holes. The rails (both top and bottom) will have 1 pocket hole on either end of the back side (not shown).

Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

**Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you provide an adequate link back to the appropriate post! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it.

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Plans

Free Woodworking Plans to Build the Easiest Pantry Cabinet Ever

10.25.10
Project Image

Have you always wanted to have the Kitchen of Your Dreams, but didn’t think you could? Too expensive? Not a DIY project you feel comfortable handling? Say no more… We continue our Dream Kitchen Series with a Pantry Cabinet. We will continue with door stylings as well as additional wall and base cabinet systems, and a few other specialty items…stay tuned for those.

As with all of our plans, you are building at your own risk and you should have a firm understanding of building in general before you attempt many of our plans (some are easy as pie and perfect for beginners). With that, go forth, have fun, take lots of pictures and share them in a showcase on the site or on social media with the hashtag #builtTDCtuff and we will share our faves! Be sure to tag @thedesignconfidential on Instagram / FB and @thedesconf on Twitter / Pinterest. If you are a blogger and you post about your build, don’t forget to include a link to your post on your showcase here. Don’t forget… for all of our newer plans, clicking on the images will let them expand to enormous sizes with much greater clarity. The older plans may need updating so please let us know if you need one fixed!

$75-$100

  • 1/2 sheet- 3/4″ Plywood (a lower grade is fine).
  • 1 sheet – 1/2″ Plywood (a lower grade is fine)
  • 1 sheet – 1/4″ Plywood (this will be showing on the sides of outside cabinets).
  • 2 – 1×2 at 10′
  • 1 – 1×4 at 6′
  • 2 – 1/4″ Ply at 83 1/2″ x 23 1/4″ Outside Panels
  • 1 – 1/4″ Ply at 76 1/4″ x 31 1/4″ Back
  • 2 – 1/2″ Ply at 3/4″ x 23 1/4″ Inside Upper ledge
  • 2 – 1/2″ Ply at 5″ x 37 3/8″ Inside Upper Front Panels
  • 2 – 1/2″ Ply at 8 3/8″ x 37 3/8″ Inside Upper Middle Panels
  • 2 – 1/2″ Ply at 8 1/4″ x 37 3/8″ Inside Upper Back Panels
  • 2 – 1/2″ Ply at 5″ x 38 1/8″ Inside Lower Front Panels
  • 2 – 1/2″ Ply at 8 3/8″ x 38 1/8″ Inside Lower Middle Panels
  • 2 – 1/2″ Ply at 8 1/4″ x 38 1/8″ Inside Lower Back Panels
  • 2 – 1/2″ Ply at 5″ x 23 1/4″ Inside Lower Bottom Panels
  • 3 – 3/4″ Ply at 23″ x 31 1/4″ Bottom, Middle, Top Shelves
  • 1 – 3/4″ Ply at 5″ x 32″ Kickplate
  • 2 – 1×2 at 79 1/4″ Sides of Face Frame (Stiles)
  • 3 – 1×2 at 28 3/4″ Face Frame Rails
  • 2 – 1×4 at 31 1/4″ Cleats

**I have designed these plans with those of you in mind who don’t own fancy blades and table saws! However, if you do happen to own fancy blades and table saws and would like to give them a whirl, simply replace the panels and spacing with one panel and dadoes and grooves of the same dimensions as the spaces I have left. Easy Peasy…

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Cut your Side Panels to size as indicated in the diagram above.

We will begin constructing the interior panels: I have made this so easy for you in the way I have designed this. You don’t need a table saw to create Dadoes, or a stopper on your drill for Shelf Bracket holes…it’s just plain easy. Cut your interior panel pieces to size (this will be mirrored on the opposite side) and attach as outlined to the outside panels. Mark out the area for your shelf standards. Follow the instructions on the shelf standards for attaching to the panels.

Attach the cleats to the back panel. This is how you will ultimately attach your cabinet to the wall using your dry wall screws.

Attach the Top, Bottom, and Middle Shelves using your Kreg Jig set for 1/2″ stock. Carve out a 3/4″ square from each top corner of your kick plate and attach from underneath (behind) using your Kreg Jig or finish nails from the front. Fasten the back panel and cleats to the side panels and shelves. Use 1″ brad nails or 5/8″ Screws.

Create your Face Frame: use your Kreg Jig set for 3/4″ stock and place your pocket holes on the rails (horizontal pieces). Fasten to your pantry using 2″ finish nails and glue.

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

**Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you provide an adequate link back to the appropriate post! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it.

Plans

Free Woodworking Plans to Build an Under Sink Base Cabinet

10.15.10
You Can Build This! Easy DIY Furniture Plans from The Design Confidential with Complete Instructions on How to Build an Under Sink Base Cabinet via @thedesconf

On we head through our Dream Kitchen Series, with a Base Cabinet for your sink area. This unit is similar to a standard double base cabinet in size, yet is quite different in construction, in that it needs to house a sink component as well as disguise the fact that it is housing it, at least from the front. It’s also typically more functional to have one single lower cabinet underneath the sink with french doors in essence, rather than 2 separate cabinets, or doors that are separated by part of the face frame.

We will continue with additional wall and base cabinet systems, a few other specialty items, and quite a few styling options for doors and drawers…stay tuned for those.

As with all of our plans, you are building at your own risk and you should have a firm understanding of building in general before you attempt many of our plans (some are easy as pie and perfect for beginners). With that, go forth, have fun, take lots of pictures and share them in a showcase on the site or on social media with the hashtag #builtTDCtuff and we will share our faves! Be sure to tag @thedesignconfidential on Instagram / FB and @thedesconf on Twitter / Pinterest. If you are a blogger and you post about your build, don’t forget to include a link to your post on your showcase here. Don’t forget… for all of our newer plans, clicking on the images will let them expand to enormous sizes with much greater clarity. The older plans may need updating so please let us know if you need one fixed!

THINGS TO NOTE // This plan will have a false drawer front on top, to blend with the other pieces in your kitchen and hide your sink component, while still remaining functional for the sink. It calls for double doors that will are slightly larger than what is required if the double base unit has a divider since we will want the doors to be wide enough to close completely without leaving a gap. If you prefer to have one of those little tilt out drawers (not really a drawer, not a cabinet exactly either, but can’t recall what these are called at the moment) instead of a having a simple and stationary false front (to hold sponges or scrubbers perhaps), I will provide a plan for that as well, and you will have the option.

We have already completed the Base Cabinet, Wall Cabinet , Pantry and Open Shelving Wall Cabinet plans as well as a door and drawer styling for a Farmhouse look. We have quite a few more plans to tackle before we can complete the dream kitchen series! With so many options for decorative touches and styles, my hope is to provide you with an extensive collection to pick and choose from, until your heart’s content.

This is a standard Base Cabinet Size for a drop in sink. The farmhouse style, oversized basins that show on the front of the cabinet unit will be constructed differently and I will provide plans for that as well. Some sinks are placed in a kitchen island or alongside a 3 drawer unit on one side and dishwasher on the other, and we will cover those options too!

This plan accounts for a counter top that is 1 1/2″ thick in total (with the backer and the counter material). If you plan to choose a counter top that is only 3/4″ thick and doesn’t require a backer board or mounting piece to install properly, you will need to increase the height of the cabinet sides and face frame by 3/4″ if you prefer for your bottom cabinetry to be a standard 36″ height.

Also note that I decided to leave out the back for this cabinet. I think it is easier and more cost effective to leave it open, if it will back up to a wall or other surface, and to allow for the plumbing to exist under there, without having additional surfaces that need to be purchased and cut to accommodate your pipes and parts. I felt that if you were to have some sort of water crisis or pluming, pipe, or disposal problem occur having full, uninhibited access down there would be favorable. After taking a peak at the cabinetry in my own home it appears that perhaps I am on to something here since we don’t have backs on any of the sink units in either the kitchen or any of the bathrooms. Maybe the builder and I were both thinking on the cheap? or with practicality…either way…

This plan also just so happens to be very similar to (or exactly the same as) one that might be used in a bathroom. Just sayin…

Please note that counter heights tend to run either 33″ or 36″ and that 36″ is what you see most often in homes. A 33″ unit might be more comfortable in a bathroom or if you aren’t of the taller persuasion (me) and in particular for a bathroom used by the kiddos and other extemporaneous folks.

Once we finish the Kitchen Series (or as we move along through it, we will also begin a bathroom collection so if you are drooling over my statement above and the building juices are beginning to boil…stay tuned. The skill set and the techniques will be exactly the same so we will have no problem making the transition! Exciting right? Oh the possibilities…

If there is an area of your home you are looking to remodel, or create from scratch, please feel free to request plans for that area in the project suggestion topic of the Forum. I tend to wander through drawing plans in a willy-nilly sort of manner, unless I have a specific need of my own, so your suggestions or requests are very welcome and provide me with a little direction.

  • 1/2 sheet- 3/4″ Plywood (**a lower grade is fine OR you can opt to use Melamine here for easily cleaned and maintained cabinetry that is a bit more water resistant, this is for a sink unit after all, and accidents are likely to occur at some point).
  • 1/2 sheet – 1/2″ Plywood (**a lower grade is fine OR just as above you can opt for Melamine)
  • 1/2 sheet – 1/4″ Plywood **important note: this will be showing on the sides of any outside cabinets, so if you are planning on staining your cabinetry and if this unit will have an exposed edge or two, you will want to buy something that matches your face frame wood specie or that has a type of grain pattern, appearance, and quality that you want your kitchen to have throughout. Your face frame, outside panels (that are exposed), kick plates, doors, and drawers should all be as consistent as possible. Different species will accept stain differently and differing grain patterns and colors (oak versus birch or maple) will potentially be very obvious, after you sand and finish.
  • 2 – 1×2 at 10′ (34 1/2″ of this is for the nailing cleat and can be substituted with any board you already own, if you prefer to save money or use materials from other cabinet plans or furniture, the width doesn’t really matter as long as it is at least 1 1/2″ and is no more than 1″ thick (3/4″ actual thickness, so a 3/4″ plywood strip is also an option) ** If you choose to substitute for the cleat you only need 1 – 1×2 at 10′ and 1 – 1×2 at 6′.
  • 1 – 1×6 at 6′ (you can also cut a narrow strip from your 3/4″ ply or melamine if you prefer (some folks prefer to avoid making cuts whenever possible and prefer prefab board sizes), this is just for support and to provide a surface for attaching the face frame to later and possibly for attaching the tilt out drawer hardware to, if you go that route later.)
  • 2 – 1/4″ Ply at 34 1/2″ x 23 1/4″ Outside Panels
  • 2 – 1/2″ Ply at 5″ x 23 1/4″ Lower Interior Panels – can also be melamine or have laminate coating
  • 2 – 1/2″ Ply at 28 3/4″ x 23 1/4″ Upper Interior Panels – can also be melamine or have laminate coating
  • 1 – 3/4″ Ply at 10 7/8″ x 23 1/4″ Bottom Shelf

**4 – 3/4″ Ply at 4″ x 4″ Right Triangles (these are the corner blocks and don’t have to be exact. The hypotenuse would be 5 21/32″ for a 4″ right triangle) ** If your sink component doesn’t allow for the corner blocks because they protrude to far, you can use a 1×3 or 1×4 fastened perpendicularly to the interior panel, that runs the depth of your interior panel from the front to the cleat (22 1/2″).

  • 1 – 5″ x 36″ – Kick Plate. It is preferable that you use solid wood for this so you don’t have to worry about finished edges, and this plan shows a 3/4″ thick kick plate (standard 1″ board thickness), BUT, this can be any thickness you prefer. Just keep in mind if you use plywood or a standard prefab 1/4″ kick plate it may not have finished edges, so this is a matter of preference.
  • 1 – 1×2 at 34 1/2″ Cleat (runs along the back to allow you to attach to the wall, if you want to use materials you already have, this can be any board type: 1×3, 1×5, etc.)
  • 2 – 1×2 at 30″ Stiles (Sides of Face Frame)
  • 3 – 1×2 at 33″ Rails (Top, Bottom, and Middle)

**2 – 1×6 at 22 1/2″ Supports (can also be 3/4″ ply or melamine, anything that is 3/4″ in thickness and should be a minimum of 5 1/2″ in width but can be as large as 6 1/4″ or so)

** this symbol suggests modifications or additional options are listed and should be read through before purchasing and cutting.

**Please note that I have designed this plan in such a manner as to allow you to build it without having to own a table saw and without the need for creating dadoes and rabbits while still achieving the same well supported and sturdy cabinetry of a professional. We are able to recreate the same framework using multiple panels and leaving spaces between vertical pieces to accommodate shelving and provide the same type of support system that creating dadoes would provide. This method for constructing cabinetry is entirely my own creation, and the laws of physics dictate that it will be equally as strong (perhaps even more so than if you were to carve out and remove sections from a single 3/4″ panel.

** If you own a table saw or router and love the chance to use it, you can build any of the cabinetry units using a single 3/4″ plywood panel rather than using a 1/2″ and 1/4″ combined. You will create your rabbets, dadoes, and grooves sized according to my spacing, as provided in the plans, and created by the different panel heights, lengths, and widths. If the interior panel in my plan is 3/4″ shorter than the outside panel, then this indicates that you need to create a dado that is 3/4″ x 1/2″ deep (interior panels are 1/2″ thickness) and with the appropriate length I have indicated.

**If you aren’t using a Kreg Jig, or for fastening in places that don’t call for one, always Pre-Drill and Counter Sink for the most professional appearance and ease of fastening (for beginners, your screws will be easier to screw in if you pre-drill). Using wood glue and clamps will help you keep your boards together while pre-drilling, countersinking, and fastening.

**Join Boards with a Pocket Hole system whenever possible (I suppose that means I am saying, buy one if you can…the Jr will work just fine and costs only $39), be sure to place your pocket holes out of site (underneath or behind whenever possible) because they will leave quite a hole to fill otherwise and if you are staining this is either problematic or expensive depending on whether you use wood filler or Kreg Plugs. Even wood filler that claims it’s stainable will take the stain differently than the wood, and will be visible.

**Check for Square after EACH step, making it a habit is the best modus operandi for building, until you are able to tell by sight if something is off (so pretty much never, for most folks). It will really matter in this project, when you go to attach the face frame, or hang a set of doors or drawers. An un-square cabinet unit will cause a world of issues later so check throughout and correct if necessary.

** As always, adhere to all safety standards and guidelines (wear safety glasses and gloves if you can. Be sure you are wearing proper footwear and clothing, and if you are prone to injury or already have one a back brace/back support/tool belt overall set is pretty nifty!

** This set of plans allows for a counter top that is 1 1/2″ thick which is typical for granite, marble, most tile even butcher block. For most counter top applications you will need a backer board that is 3/4″ to support it and fasten it to, though some tile applications will allow for 1/2″ backer, in which case it will be up to you as to whether you adjust your cabinet height to accommodate the additional 1/4″ for standard height, leave it as is or just use 3/4″ backer. If you plan to choose a counter top that is only 3/4″ thick and doesn’t require a backer board or mounting piece to install properly(can’t think of many off the top of my head, but…you never know), you will need to increase the height of this cabinet sides and face frame by 3/4″ to reach standard counter height (or disregard that extra 3/4″) or decrease the cabinet size by 2 1/4″ to lower to 33″ high cabinetry.

Cut your Side Panels to size and notch out as indicated in the diagram below.

Cut the interior panels to size as indicated: I have made this so easy for you in the way I have designed this. You don’t need a table saw to create Dadoes, and it isn’t necessary to carve out a notch for the nailing cleat unless you have some great desire to use your table saw or other saw type…this is just plain easy.

Don’t forget both the outside panel above and both interior panels will be mirrored on the other side, so you will need to double the number shown.

Attach the cleats, shelf and corner blocks to the interior panels. The cleat is is how you will ultimately attach your cabinet to the wall using your dry wall screws, if you fear you may be working with a wall that is uneven consider leaving 1/8″ space just behind the cleat to accommodate any irregularities and allow extra space to stabilize and level your unit as needed.
Use your Kreg set for 1/2″ stock for each of these attachments and your 1″ PHS to fasten . If you aren’t using a Kreg Jig, you will fasten using 1 1/4″ screws from the outside of the interior panels and from underneath the shelf prior fastening to the Upper Interior Panel, then glue the Lower Interior Panel to the bottom of the shelf. It will be stable because of how it will sit on the Lower Interior Panel and will be secured in place once you attach the Outside Panels.
If your sink component doesn’t fit using the corner blocks as indicated below, you can replace them with a 1×3 or 1×4 that runs along each upper interior panel from front to back, and fasten to the interior panels in the same manner as the corner blocks would have been attached, using your Kreg Jig set for 1/2″ stock and your 1″ PHS, then you will place the vertical supports (in the next step) directly below these supports and they will provide an additional level of support to the perpendicular boards. See 2nd diagram in this step to view the diagram for the boards as they would be positioned and attached.

If you are replacing the corner blocks with a board to allow for a wider sink basin, they will attach as shown below:

Attach the Supports, Notch out and attach the Kick Plate: The supports will run the depth of your panel and will sit flush with the front. Secure them to the cleat and to the corner blocks and it will provide extra support for them.

Notch out a 3/4″ Square from both top corners of your Kick Plate. If you are using a Kick Plate that is 1/2″ – 3/4″ thick, you can fasten from behind using your Kreg Jig set for 1/2″ stock and your 1″ PHS. You can also use your finish nails to fasten from the front, into the lower panels. If you are using a 1/4″ thick Kick Plate, fastening with finish nails from the front, is a how you will attach it.

Create your Face Frame: use your Kreg Jig set for 3/4″ stock and use your 1 1/4″ PHS. Place your pocket holes on the rails (horizontal pieces). Fasten to your cabinet using 2″ finish nails and glue. You can fasten the face frame to the panels, shelf, supports and the corner blocks to ensure a tight and secure fit (the bottom rail to the shelf, the middle rail to the supports, the top rail to the corner blocks, etc.). After your glue has set or you have attached the face frame to the cabinet unit, you can run a thin line of wood filler down the seam to prevent water entry and to disguise the attachment. You may need to fill this more than once since filler has a tendency to shrink as it dries.

Fill any remaining visible holes, if you have any, sand, and finish as desired. The manner in which this plan was designed allows you to avoid most visible holes with exception of the Face Frame and your finish nails…But, they are awfully small so it shouldn’t be very obvious if you are staining, assuming you don’t go crazy with the nail gun.

// Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you ONLY use 1 image and provide an ADEQUATE link back to the original source and appropriate plan! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential. By accessing or using any part of the web site, you agree to become bound by the terms and conditions of this website as outlined under Terms of Use. If you do not agree to all the terms and conditions of this agreement, then you may not access the Website or use any services. The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by The Design Confidential.com and while we endeavor to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, personal injury or death, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of information or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of this website. I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it. The Design Confidential.com is inspired by but does not replicate exact designs, any similarities between these plans and items sold at specialty retailers is coincidental and not endorsed by or related to any said retailers. // Affiliate links are used for tools and materials. The Design Confidential will earn a small commission for any items purchased using these links. Thank you for your support – every little bit counts!

Plans

Free DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Slatted Louis XVI Chair for under $25

10.09.10
You Can Build This! Easy DIY Plans from The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a Louis XVI Slatted Chair via @thedesconf

This plan is an easy to build version of my most favorite chair and this plan has absolutely no upholstery, for those of you with kiddo’s and who need to something easier to maintain than an upholstered dining chair. It should cost no more than approximately $25 to build, give or take, depending on your region.

As with all of our plans, you are building at your own risk and you should have a firm understanding of building in general before you attempt many of our plans (some are easy as pie and perfect for beginners). With that, go forth, have fun, take lots of pictures and share them in a showcase on the site or on social media with the hashtag #builtTDCtuff and we will share our faves! Be sure to tag @thedesignconfidential on Instagram / FB and @thedesconf on Twitter / Pinterest. If you are a blogger and you post about your build, don’t forget to include a link to your post on your showcase here. Don’t forget… for all of our newer plans, clicking on the images will let them expand to enormous sizes with much greater clarity. The older plans may need updating so please let us know if you need one fixed!

Under $25

  • 2 – 2×2 at 8′
  • 1 – 2×4 at 8′
  • 1 – 1×4 at 8′
  • 1 – 1/2″x3/4″ square trim at 8′
  • 1 – 1×2 at 6′ (or less, you just need a very small amount)
  • 2 – 2×4 at 40” (Back legs)
  • 2 – 2×2 at 17 1/4” (front legs)
  • 7 – 2×2 at 16” (chair aprons and rails)
  • 1 – 1×2 at 16″ (chair seat)
  • 5 – 1×4 at 19″ (chair seat)
  • 5 – 1/2″x3/4″ at 17″ (slats)

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Cut your 2×4’s in the shape and dimensions indicated below. To begin, draw out the cut lines as you see them here, go slow, and be accurate. You will have the most success cutting this, with either a circular saw or jig saw. A jig saw can cut right along the lines you draw, whereas with a circular saw, you will need to stop at each change of direction and angle, and carve out the triangular piece you began with, before moving on in another direction. You want to be sure both legs match and that the bottom of the legs, and the 3” vertical center (where the seat will connect), line up as perfectly as possible. To ensure matching dimensions and angles, clamp the legs together after you cut them out, and sand the matching faces of both at the same time for all 4 sides. Once they are matching and sanded, connect them with the rail as indicated below. It will sit at the bottom of the 3” vertical space on the legs..

Build the front: cut all pieces to size, then place your pocket holes in the areas indicated below. Use your 1 1/2” setting and your 2 1/2” pocket hole screws.

Fasten slats to the chair front from underneath, use glue and fasten up through the chair aprons, all the way around, to hide attachments. Then attach the chair front to the chair back. Use the back aprons to attach to the back legs, and secure from the inside. Tack on the last seat slat, your 1×2 seat slat, that should sit directly on top of the back apron between the back legs.

Cut your rails and slats to size, and note the slats are actually 1” longer than the dimension which will show. Create your pocket holes on the rails and drill your holes in both the top and bottom rails to house your slats. To create slat holes, mark out your drill hole locations by finding your middle, then dividing the remaining space in thirds. You should be placing the remaining holes approximately 2 2/3” apart. To create slat holes, use a 1/2” drill bit with a collar stop at 1/2”. This can be even a piece of masking tape marking the spot on your drill for 1/2”. This will keep you from drill farther than 1/2” into the rails. The slats are actually housed inside the rails by a 1/2” on the top and bottom and only need a bit of glue to be held in place, however if you prefer to also fasten with a pocket hole, you may. Once your holes have been drilled, secure the bottom rail in place (to the legs), drop in the slats with a drop of glue in each hole, then place a drop of glue in each hole for the top rail and turn over to set on top of the slats. Secure the top rail to the legs.

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

**Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you provide an adequate link back to the appropriate post! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it. / Affiliate links are used for tools and materials. The Design Confidential will earn a small commission for any items purchased using these links. Thank you for your support – every little bit counts!

Plans

Build a Butcher Block Cutting Board

10.01.10
Project Image

This plan will give you an oversized cutting board that would even make Martha Stewart proud! Provided for are options for both striped and checkerboard patterns, but a single color and specie is always an option. The technique for butcher block counter tops, is almost precisely the same, only the pattern and layout is different. We will cover that shortly, for those of you who would like that option for your dream kitchen counter tops!

Estimated Cost

Under $25

Tools
  • Sander
  • Saw
  • Clamps
Lumber
  • 2×2’s in varying tight grained species:
  • 2 – 2×2 at 6′ in dark tight grained specie
  • 2 – 2×2 at 8′ in light tight grained specie
  • Be sure to ask your local salesperson to direct you to all of the tight grained species available in your area. Purchase in varying colors if a multi-colored pattern is what you desire (stripes or checker)
Materials
  • Wood Glue – preferably something non-toxic since your food will come in contact with this.
  • Sanding Supplies
  • Mineral Oil
Cut List
  • Striped:
  • 6 – 2×2 at 24″ for dark specie
  • 7 – 2×2 at 24″ for light specie
  • Checkerboard:
  • 6 – 2×2 at 19 1/2″ for dark specie
  • 7 – 2×2 at 19 1/2″ for light specie
Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1
Step 1

Striped: Cut your boards to size and sand each edge that will sit adjacent to another edge. Be sure each joining edge is flat and forms a right angle. Set them in an alternating pattern until you are pleased with the design and size. Run a line of water tight glue along one edge of the joining pair. Clamp and tighten periodically as the glue sets. Be sure to immediately wipe any glue that seeps out as you tighten, before it sets. Once your glue has set, use your sander to smooth and create a flat cutting surface. Once you have sanded you can prepare your surface by pouring mineral oil over all sides and surfaces and allow to penetrate for 5 minutes before wiping away the excess. Repeat periodically to keep your board in good condition.

Step 2
Step 2

Checkerboard: Follow the instructions in the previous step for completing the striped cutting board. Once your glue has set in a striped pattern, you will then cut your board into 1 1/2″ strips in the opposite direction as your stripes run and create strips with alternating color blocks. Use a table saw or circular saw for this (you could also use a jig saw if need be). You will then join these strips after you turn every other one over end to end, and repeat the directions from the previous step. Glue along one edge of each adjoining pair, clamp and tighten periodically as the glue sets. Be sure to wipe away excess glue as before. Once dry, sand well and cover with mineral oil. Allow to penetrate for 5 minutes and wipe away excess. Repeat as necessary to prolong the life of your cutting board.

Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

**Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you provide an adequate link back to the appropriate post! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it.

Plans

Free Woodworking Plans to Build a Hudson Tall Dresser Part 2 The Assembly

09.30.10
Project Image

We are back, and ready to start putting this beauty together!

Please click here to visit Part 1 of this dresser plan for constructing the components.

The assembly is really very simple and straight forward, each piece will fit nicely together like a piece of a puzzle!  Please refer to this post for instructions on creating and building the components for this piece.  Once you are finished head back here, and let’s put the pieces together!

The finishing possibilities for this are endless! I normally like the reclaimed look, or something with a natural or weathered coloring, but I am pretty smitten with the espresso finish below too!

Dimensions
Dimensions for This Project
Tools

See Part 1 for Tools

Lumber

See Part 1 for Lumber

Materials

See Part 1 for materials

Cut List

See Part 1 for cut list

Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1
Step 1
Step 1

You have already constructed your Base, now you will need to begin by fastening the bottom Drawer Supports and Panels to each other and then the base. You can see in the diagram below, how the pieces will fit together. You can attach the Bottom Supports to the Base and then slide in the Panels, but you will need a very tight fit and it might be wise to simply set up the supports and panels, screw them together, and then transfer them to the Base and attach. If you are working alone (as I usually am) this will be tricky to do. I suggest you align the Supports on the Base and clamp them down according to the dimensions shown below and use your middle panel as a placeholder, to ensure you are leaving just the right amount of space between the supports, mark the base and remove the middle panel so that you can flip the base over to attach the supports.

Fasten the Supports and the Panels to the Base from underneath using 2″ Screws, fasten the Panels to the Supports using 2″ Screws from the outside of the Panels, near the bottom and Use 1 1/4″ Screws to fasten from the Edge of the Supports down into the Bottom Insert of the Panels (the 1×2’s you attached in the previous post).

Step 2
Step 2

Attach the Top to the Cleats. Use 1 1/4″ Screws.

Then insert remaining Drawer Supports. They should fit tightly into their designated spaces. If you have trouble getting one in it’s space, sand down the top and bottom edge of the outside edges a tiny bit until it fits. You want it to fit tightly, so if you struggle a bit to get it in, that is perfect. If it is a tad loose, that will probably be fine also, just be sure you properly secure it to the Panels and if necessary, you can use a 1 1/4″ Screw to tack it down at an angle to the insert it is resting on.

Secure the Back in place using 1″ Screws. You can fasten it to the Panels and the Supports if you like, just keep in mind that if you don’t countersink, those attachments will be visible. since it is the Back…you may not care.

Step 3
Step 3
Step 3

Attach your Face Frame: use 1 1/4″ Finish Nails to secure in place. It should hang over the side Panels a tad on the outside edges and will accommodate Trim in the next step. It will sit right on the Base, just as the Main body does and will be flush with the top of the Panels. Line the Stiles of the Frame up with the Legs. Secure to the Panels, and the drawer supports with finish nails, and the base from underneath with 2″ screws.

Once your Frame is in place attach the trim.

Step 4
Step 4

You should now be ready to slide your Drawers in! If you have trouble with your drawers gliding, sand the edges of your runner down. You can also use a bit of wax on them if you need a extra gliding/sliding power. I don’t recommend using anything you wouldn’t want to get on your clothing. I think you can ensure proper gliding by sanding well and rounding corners a bit.

Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

**Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you ONLY use 1 image and provide an ADEQUATE link back to the original source and appropriate plan! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it.

Plans

Free Woodworking Plans to Build the Easiest Base Cabinet Ever

09.24.10

Have you always wanted to have the Kitchen of Your Dreams, but didn’t think you could? Too expensive? Not a DIY project you feel comfortable handling? Say no more… You have asked…I have listened. I am so excited to be sharing this with you today! We are going to begin our Kitchen Series…I can’t wait to dive in and show you all, that you can in fact build your own Dream Kitchen and you don’t even have to outfit your workspace with every crazy expensive tool known to man, to do it. You can also be a beginner and tackle this project given the way I have designed this plan. Nothing tricky, nothing difficult…just pure and simple goodness. This is a standard Base Cabinet Size so it shouldn’t be difficult to work into your kitchen in just the way your mind imagines.

As with all of our plans, you are building at your own risk and you should have a firm understanding of building in general before you attempt many of our plans (some are easy as pie and perfect for beginners). With that, go forth, have fun, take lots of pictures and share them in a showcase on the site or on social media with the hashtag #builtTDCtuff and we will share our faves! Be sure to tag @thedesignconfidential on Instagram / FB and @thedesconf on Twitter / Pinterest. If you are a blogger and you post about your build, don’t forget to include a link to your post on your showcase here. Don’t forget… for all of our newer plans, clicking on the images will let them expand to enormous sizes with much greater clarity. The older plans may need updating so please let us know if you need one fixed!

 

$50-$75

**You can buy full sheets if you plan to build several cabinets.

  • 1/2 sheet- 3/4″ Plywood (a lower grade is fine).
  • 1/2 sheet – 1/2″ Plywood (a lower grade is fine)
  • 1/2 sheet – 1/4″ Plywood (this will be showing on the sides of outside cabinets, but will not show on the back or inside cabinet walls).
  • 1 – 1×2 at 8′
  • 1 – 1×2 T 6′
  • **5″ kick plate or you can use any of your plywood sheets above to cut this out.
Cut List
  • 2 – 1/4″ Ply at 35 1/4″ x 23 1/4″ Outside Panels
  • 1 – 1/4″ Ply at 35 1/4″ x 17 1/2″ Back
  • 2 – 1/2″ Ply at 29 1/2″ x 22 7/8″ Inside Upper Panels
  • 2 – 1/2″ Ply at 5″ x 22 7/8″ Inside Lower Panels
  • 3 – 3/4″ Ply at 5 1/2″ x 16 1/2″ Supports
  • 2 – 3/4″ Ply at 4″ x 22 7/8″ Drawer Hangers
  • **1 – 3/4″ Ply at 5″ x 18″ Kick Plate, you can also use any of the other plywood thickness’ or a prefab kick plate.
  • 1 – 1×2 at 16 1/2″ Cleat
  • 2 – 1×2 at 31″ Stiles (Face Frame)
  • 3 – 1×2 at 15″ Rails (Face Frame)

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1

Cut your Side Panels to size as indicated in the diagram below.

Step 2

We will begin constructing the interior panels: I have made this so easy for you in the way I have designed this. You don’t need a table saw to create Dadoes, or a stopper on your drill for Shelf Bracket holes…it’s just plain easy. Cut your interior panel pieces to size (this will be mirrored on the opposite side, so truly you will need 4 pieces total) and mark out the area for your shelf peg holes. You won’t need them in the upper 12″ or the bottom 4″ or so, since you will have a drawer and a bottom shelf. You can create a template with the dimensions shown below, for ease of use, then flip it around to do the other side. They also sell this sort of thing, and there is no reason why you can’t simply mark out your places and drill, just be sure you are accurate so your shelf isn’t sloping. Space your holes about an 1 1/2″ apart.

Step 3

I know many of you have a thing about Drawer Guides/Slides so this process below, makes it a snap. Create a Drawer Hanger (blue) that runs the depth of your cabinet and 4″ in height. Attach your Drawer Guide/Slide to this piece prior to attaching it to your Panel. This gives you more control, you aren’t working at a funny angle and you can lay it out in front of you to be sure it’s level and equal on both sides! So much easier right? Then attach the cleat at the back of your side panel (yellow). It will sit flush with the top and back of the panels on both sides and can be attached using your Pocket Hole System set for 1/2″ stock or with 1 1/4″ Screws from the outside of the panels. Attach your Drawer Hangers (blue) just below that cleat, running the length of the cabinet panel, and one of your Supports (red) will sit just below that. They will act as simple building blocks. The Top support (red) shown in the diagram will sit flush with the front of your panels, just as the lower support does, however it won’t rest on another piece, there will be a 3/4″ space between it and your Drawer Hanger. The Upper Back Support will rest flush with the top of the Panels just as the Top Support in the diagram above does, only this one will rest against the cleat as well. Attach these with your Pocket Hole System set for 1/2″ Stock or use 1 1/4″ Screws from the outside.0

Step 4

Attach the Outside Panels, and insert your bottom shelf. The bottom shelf will help you align your interior panels so they “fit” the outside panels properly. Carve out a 3/4″ square in each corner of your Kick Plate. I have used a 3/4″ Kick Plate in this example because I like the continuity it proves from the face frame…however, feel free to use any thickness you like. Typical would be 1/4″ or so. You can attach this finish nails, or my personal preference is to fasten them from behind with a Pocket Hole System. Your outside panels will sit flush with the front of the Interior panels and the top, however they will extend beyond the backside by 3/8″ to allow for the back and a bit of wiggle room later.

Step 5

Build the Face Frame: use your Pocket hole System to build the frame, and place your pocket holes in the rails (horizontal pieces) set for 3/4″ stock. Then attach using 2″ finish nails. If you aren’t using a PHS, attach the Frame pieces directly to the cabinet using 2″ finish nails. Attach your back: Use 7/8″ Brads to tack on you back. Fasten into the 1/2″ Ply interior panels, the cleat, lower shelf and so on.

Step 7
Step 8
Step 9
Step 11
Step 12
Step 13
Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

**Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you ONLY use 1 image and provide an ADEQUATE link back to the original source and appropriate plan! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it.

Build

Lumber and The Raw Deal

09.16.10
The Design Confidential Lumber and the Raw Deal

Even if you don’t consider yourself a builder or the building type, chances are you may encounter an experience in your life, at some point, that may make this info come in handy. You can never go wrong being armed with knowledge and this will most likely help clear up confusion about how to purchase boards, should you decide to give a furniture plan (or any other project using boards) a go…

If you detest everything about building, and never want to do anything other than overpay for specialty retailer furniture, then this post is not for you… For all of the rest of you, I hope to have my site become a place to learn, share inspiration and know-how, and yet to have it be a comfortable place to ask questions and not worry about feeling silly. If you have a question, chances are there are others with the same questions and hopefully there are other folks who can direct and help you on the topic of your question. …anyhoo…back to the topic at hand…

Those of you who read through my plans have probably noticed that I stick to fairly consistent board dimensions when I provide cut lists, materials, and as I go through describing the steps for building. What you may not have noticed, if you aren’t a building junkie, or are just getting your feet wet in this new arena, is that the dimensions I call out are actually different than the dimensions I use to draw up the plans themselves…

Now don’t get crazy on me here…I am not trying to say that I provide inaccurate dimensions in my plans. What I am attempting to tell you is that the standard dimensions used to label or describe boards, at your lumber supply or hardware store (and yes on every site that discusses lumber), are just that…labels…

The labels or dimensions listed are not actually the true dimensions of the boards they are representing. When someone talks of a 2×4, everyone who is older than the age of 6 or 7 (some even younger) knows what, or approximately what, they are referring to. These labels (dimensions) are standard call tags for describing particular items, i.e. 1×3’s, 1×2’s, 4×4’s etc.

There is actually a logical reason for this, though it isn’t one that is logical for the consumer so much as for the manufacturer…which means, other than ease of saying 1×3, with it’s nice round even proportions, it really isn’t that helpful and might as well be accurate..alas I digress…

The explanation for this inaccuracy comes to us from the manufacturing process itself and how they account for their inventory. When they refer to a 2×4 they are speaking of the actual dimensions at the time of it being cut from it’s larger unit. In the process of taking that 2×4 from it’s mother-ship to the lumber supply floors, it goes through a drying and planing process so that we can have nice, even, and square boards that won’t warp or twist during their lifetime as members of a larger furniture piece (though with that much removal and shrinkage you would think we would see prettier boards more often). Since timber companies account for their inventory based on total usable volume (what else are they going to do…count trees?), you can see how it might be useful to them to notate the original dimensions before shrinkage and planing. If they didn’t, there would be a discrepancy between output and actual consumption…that would be a big problem (think back to your college days in econ and what happens when supply and demand are out of whack, this isn’t the same thing, but you get my point). It would appear on their financial reports as though they are experiencing inventory shrinkage (usually for errors and other possible issues, not so much a good thing for anyone (especially those of us who are low on the totem poles and have to make up for that loss of theirs through increased prices…).

The Design Confidential Lumber and the Raw Deal

By the time the boards have finished the manufacturing process they have lost about a 1/2″ for both length and width. This actually tends to increase to a loss of about 3/4″ in larger sizes (2×10’s and such) This actually makes a 2×4 closer to a 1.5×3.5…which is a little bit harder to say, not as smooth sounding, for sure…but…more accurate for designing and building furniture with very specific dimensions.

When you are learning to buy and build with dimensional lumber, this is pretty confusing if your local store sells lumber labeled more accurately (my nearest Orange does this, none of the others near by do…?) and I have indicated you buy something that you simply aren’t seeing on the shelves. Or perhaps you are a bit measurement crazed and in the process of measuring 100x so you only have to cut once, you have stumbled onto the fact that the board you thought you bought is actually not that, and you fear you have purchased (and built) with the wrong materials…that would be soooo sadddd.

So, the skinny on dimensional lumber is that, the labels I provide in plans are the labels commonly used in hardware stores and big box stores for construction use. I stick with the common lingo so as not to confuse you and so that you can find what you need easily and speak with sales associates using a common language.

When I draw up plans, however, I use the true dimensions because this is the only way to give you accurate cut measurements and spacing, but for most of you this isn’t something that matters. If I tell you the legs are 1×3’s and that the overall width of a table is 20″, that would mean that the space between the legs (and probably your apron or frame dimension) would be 14″…right?

No. and you would be confused when you cut a 14″ apron and tacked your legs on either end and only came up with a 19″ total width. So I tell you to use 1×3’s but I draw plans using the true dimension of a 1×3 which is closer to 3/4″x2.5″. This gives me the proper cut length for your apron and you go on never knowing that the bait and switch has transpired…aaaahhh ignorance is bliss, is it not?

I suppose I should explain this rambling narrative though…those of you who have interacted with me in any capacity may have noticed that I tend to be a fan of a collective of knowledge rather than a dictatorship of tyranny. That being said, when I provide you with free plans, it is because I truly love designing furniture and have adored furniture since I was old enough to know what my eyeballs were looking at…This is my love and my passion, and creating and building is my obsession and addiction! Misery loves company…so I hope you will join me!

I want you to gain from my experience and any knowledge I have. Whether in the form of inexpensive designer furniture that you can create in any color and style you like or from the satisfaction of building something with your own two hands..I want to share it with you and cheer you on along the way…BUT…

I also want to arm you with the knowledge necessary to take what I provide or teach you to the next level. This is the greatest accomplishment I can achieve…by making you all avid furniture builders and advanced DIY’ers you will go forth and live very successful and fulfilling lives at least as far as the home front is concerned…

You may like my furniture plans but what if you just simply need something to be twice as large as my plans outline, for it to work in your home? Or you like the basic piece but want to style it differently. Well, if you take the time to read this, and begin to accumulate knowledge and experience, you can make these modifications on your own and without any help from me or anyone else! That is an amazing feeling. If you are a home-maker, you are considered a home-maker of the highest caliber if you can not only build your own furniture, but MODIFY IT TO SUIT YOUR NEEDS and perhaps even DESIGN IT, TOO! If you are a woodworking hobbyist, having the ability to visualize modifications or design plans prior to building will help ensure any changes or modifications will work, pretty important stuff!

I am providing the following chart with the hope that those of you who love to build, will one day have the skill set to do anything you want or need, and modify plans in any way you require…to truly learn the building skill set! Even if you never plan on sketching furniture plans…this skill set is necessary to understand how you will make cuts if you are changing the dimensions of any plan you are working with and to accommodate locally available materials (for those of you who can’t get 4×4’s untreated, it would be helpful for you to know how to combine 2 – 2×4’s to get a similar result…but you will need to alter a few dimensions since a 2×4 is the same length as a 4×4 but not the same width when you combine 2..it comes in a little shy of the original measurements and will require adjusting additional pieces.)

I hope you take this and future information I provide, and run with it…learn to design your own pieces and return to share your masterpieces with the rest of us! I am happy to help along the way and even to draw plans for a really good design if you aren’t able. If you are knowledgeable in woodworking, lumber, tools, or finishing we would love to have you join the forum and share your knowledge with us. I am only one person and I am pretty sure someone told me, it takes a village…

Below I have outlined the basic board sizes that will be available to you from your local hardware store. Hardwoods and lumber supply options can be a bit more extensive in their offerings and sizes, but these are the standards you will use time and again. The larger beams are most commonly used in outdoor structures, so if you are sticking with furniture, you will not need to concern yourself with those.

** Please keep in mind that these measurements may vary by manufacturer and processing. I typically see the larger widths vary 1/4″ or so, and instead of 7 1/4″ you may have 7 1/2″ available at your store… Knowing these variations exist is helpful in understanding if you need to alter dimensions to accommodate more or less width for your board.

Exploded Log Cross Sections by Vincent Kohler via here

I will be making a concerted effort to bulk up our ‘Getting Started’ section in the next few weeks as well as our ‘Tool Time’ and ‘Tips and Tricks’ sections. Please don’t be shy if you have questions, it will help me address these topics more thoroughly!

Plans

Free Woodworking Plans to Build a Stackable Cube Chair

09.07.10

This is the chameleon of furniture pieces..Chair, Stack-able Cube, Ottoman, Bookshelf…I suppose the options are virtually limitless. This should be very easy to build with the right tools, and fairly budget friendly as well.

Believe it or not, this is one single design arranged several ways.

Estimated Cost

Under $25

Tools
  • Tape Measure
  • Drill
  • Kreg Jig
  • Saw
  • Miter Saw – optional – if you prefer to bevel the front edge of the Seat portion of the stackable cube chair. Not required.
Lumber

For one cube/chair

  • 1 – 2×10 at 8′
  • 1 – 2×10 at 6′
Materials
  • 2 1/2″ Pocket Hole Screws
  • Wood Glue
  • Wood Filler
  • Sandpaper
  • Finishing Supplies
Cut List
  • 2 – 2×10 at 31 1/2″ (Back Boards)
  • 2 – 2×10 at 15 3/4″ (Front Boards)
  • 2 – 2×10 at 15 1/2″ (Base Boards)
  • 2 – 2×10 at 17″ (Seat)
Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1

Attach your Back Boards to each other staggering your Pocket Holes. Do the same for your Front Boards, the Base Boards, and the Seat. Bevel the Seat and Front Boards if you are choosing to do so. Create your Pocket holes for fastening these ‘pairs’ to each other as well. Then fasten the Back Boards to the Base Boards and the Base Boards to the Seat.

Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

**Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you ONLY use 1 image and provide an ADEQUATE link back to the original source and appropriate plan! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it.

Plans

DIY Furniture Plans to Build a Rectangular Provence Dining Table

09.01.10
Project Image

This table is another piece in the Provence Collection puzzle. It’s beauty is unquestionable, but it’s unique character is what I love. Notice the direction of the table top beams…not typical by any means with it’s horizontal placement! Love it…I also love the $3550 price tag reduction that comes with building it yourselves! This collection is actually meant for outdoor use and has board spacing to accommodate water run off or potential weather issues that may arise. I personally love this piece for indoor use equally as much! This plan has been modified for ease of building and readily available materials and is in no way affiliated with the above mentioned specialty retailer.

Estimated Cost

$25-$50

Dimensions
Dimensions for This Project
Tools
  • Tape Measure
  • Square
  • Sander
  • Drill
  • Saw – you may be able to have your local lumber supply make these cuts for you.
  • Kreg Jig – I suggest purchasing one if you are planning on building this beautiful table, you should do it properly and without blemish, though it can be done without the use of one.
  • Nail Gun – optional but will allow you to connect your table top boards without blemish.
Lumber
  • 4 – 2×10 at 10′
  • 12 – 2×4 at 10′
  • 1 – 2×4 at 8′
Materials
  • 2 1/2″ Pocket Hole Screws (PHS).
  • 2 1/2″ Screws
  • 2 1/2″ Finish Nails – optional for table top
  • Wood Glue
  • Wood Filler
  • Sandpaper
  • Finishing Supplies
Cut List
  • 9 – 2×10 at 43″ (Table Top)
  • 4- 4×4 at 27 1/2″ (Legs) if you are using 2×4’s instead you will have 8 at 27 1/2″
  • 4 – 2×4 at 84 1/2″ (Table Frame)
  • 2 – 2×4 at 36″ (Side Table Frame Supports) if you are using 2×4’s for the legs this will change to 37″.
  • 4 – 2×4 at 1 3/4″ (Spacers)
  • 2 – 2×4 at 81″ (Aprons)
Instructions

** Since this project can be used outdoors, consider finishing (or sealing) each board prior to assembling to ensure the most water tight and protected coating. Certain wood species tend to be a bit better for outdoor use as a general rule: Cedar, Redwood, and Teak are a few. The original piece that this is modeled after is made from Reclaimed Teak and has the most amazing graining and color. This is likely to be difficult for you to find, but you can substitute with the wood specie of your choice and give your piece a reclaimed finish.

**The original uses large beams for the legs and I have specified untreated 4×4’s, however if you are unable to find these feel free to substiture with 2 – 2×4’s glued and screwed together. If this is your plan you will need to add an 1″ to the length of the Side Table Frame Supports. Otherwise you shouldn’t have any changes that come from making the switch.

** Since this project can be used outdoors, consider finishing (or sealing) each board prior to assembling to ensure the most water tight and protected coating. Certain wood species tend to be a bit better for outdoor use as a general rule: Cedar, Redwood, and Teak are a few. The original piece that this is modeled after is made from Reclaimed Teak and has the most amazing graining and color. This is likely to be difficult for you to find, but you can substitute with the wood specie of your choice and give your piece a reclaimed finish.

**The original uses large beams for the legs and I have specified untreated 4×4’s, however if you are unable to find these feel free to substiture with 2 – 2×4’s glued and screwed together. If this is your plan you will need to add an 1″ to the length of the Side Table Frame Supports. Otherwise you shouldn’t have any changes that come from making the switch.

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1
Step 1

If you are a Kreg Jig owner, skip to step 3 and attach the Outside Aprons first. You won’t need the spacers and doing this step first is easiest for you. The Apron will sit back 1/4″ from the outside edge of the Legs.Then head back to this step and proceed. Fasten the Table Frame Supports to the Legs. Leave 1 3/4″ on either side for the Side Table Frame Supports in the next step. Before you attach these to the legs, create the Pocket holes on either end, for fastening them to the Side Table Frame Supports as well. You will set your Kreg Jig for 1 1/2″ stock.

Step 2
Step 2

Fasten the Side Table Frame Supports to the Table Frame Supports. If using a Kreg Jig you will fasten from the inside, and otherwise you will countersink and fasten from the outside into the Table Frame supports. Then attach the remaining 2 Support Beams.

Step 3
Step 3

For all of you non-Kreg Jig Owners, you will need to fasten little 1 3/4″ Spacers to the Legs and then fasten the outside Aprons to the Spacers. For the Kreg Owners, you have already addressed this step and can proceed to fastening the table top boards in place in the next step.

Step 4
Step 4

Fasten the Table Top boards in place using 2 1/2″ Screws or Finish Nails, and fasten to the Supports, Legs, and Aprons. Leave approximately 1/2″ between boards. Because this has slightly funny dimensioning, I recommend fastening the 2 boards on the outside first. Then fasten the middle board by taking the midpoint measurement of the remaining space and the midpoint of the board and attaching. Find the midpoint between the middle and outside boards and fasten the next set of boards and so on and so forth. We are working with an odd number so this should be pretty simple and is the easiest way to work with decimal measurements.

Finishing Instructions

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

**Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you provide an adequate link back to the appropriate post! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it.

Plans

Free Woodworking Plans to Build an RH Inspired Printmakers Desk

08.29.10
Project Image

This piece is just amazing, and with the right tools, simple to build.

As with all of our plans, you are building at your own risk and you should have a firm understanding of building in general before you attempt many of our plans (some are easy as pie and perfect for beginners). With that, go forth, have fun, take lots of pictures and share them in a showcase on the site or on social media with the hashtag #builtTDCtuff and we will share our faves! Be sure to tag @thedesignconfidential on Instagram / FB and @thedesconf on Twitter / Pinterest. If you are a blogger and you post about your build, don’t forget to include a link to your post on your showcase here. Don’t forget… for all of our newer plans, clicking on the images will let them expand to enormous sizes with much greater clarity. The older plans may need updating so please let us know if you need one fixed!

Dimensions for This Project

 

  • 3 – 3/4″ Sheet of Plywood (4’x8′)
  • 2 – 1/2″ Plywood (4’x8′)
  • 3 – 2×3 at 8′
  • 1 – 2×3 at 10′
  • 17 – 1×3 at 10′
  • 1 – 1×3 at 6′
  • 1 – 1×2 at 10′ (if you aren’t mitering you will need an additional 1×2 @ 6′)
  • 3 – 1×4 at 10′
  • 1 – 1×4 at 6′
  • 1 – 3/4 x 3/4 Square (Trim) at 8′
  • 1 – 3/4″ x 3/4″ Square (Trim) at 6′
  • ** OR 1 – 3/4″x3/4″ trim at 13 Linear Feet if you purchase random length trim.
  • 1 – 3/4″ Plywood at 80 x 28″ Main Panel
  • 2 – 3/4″ Ply at 24 1/2 x 25″ (Bottom Panels)
  • 4 – 3/4″ Ply at 24 1/2 x 21 1/4″ (Side Panels)
  • 2 – 3/4″ Ply at 21 1/2 x 24 1/2″ (Shelves)
  • 4 – 3/4″ Ply at 24 1/2 x 4 3/4″ (Upper Dividers)
  • 1 – 3/4″ Ply at 78 1/2 x 25″ (Box Top)
  • 2 – 3/4″ Ply at 3 3/4 x 19 1/2″ (Upper Outside False Backs)
  • 1 – 3/4″ Ply at 3 3/4 x 31″ (Upper Inside False Back)
  • 2 – 3/4″ Ply at 21 1/4 x 19 1/2″ (Lower False Backs)
  • 1 – 1/2″ Ply at 78 1/2 x 4 3/4″ (Upper Back Panel)
  • 2 – 1/2″ Ply at 23 x 21 1/4″ (Lower Back Panels)
  • 1 – 1/2″ Ply at 21 3/4 x 28 1/4″ (Bottom of Top Center Drawer)
  • 2 – 1/2″ Ply at 21 3/4 x 16 3/4″ (Bottoms of Outside Top Drawers)
  • 4 – 1/2″ Ply at 22 1/4 x 17 1/4″ (Bottoms of Middle and Bottom Drawers)
  • 4 – 1/2″ Ply at 7 3/4 x 17 1/4″ (Front and Back of Middle Drawers)
  • 4 – 1/2″ Ply at 7 3/4 x 23 1/4″ (Sides of Middle Drawers)
  • 4 – 1/2″ Ply at 12 1/4 x 23 1/4″ (Sides of Bottom Drawers)
  • 4 – 1/2″ Ply at 12 1/4 x 17 1/4″ (Front and Back of Bottom Drawers)
  • 8 – 2×3 at 24 1/4″ (Legs)
  • 8 – 2×3 at 3 3/4″ (Upper Legs)
  • 2 – 2×3 at 80″ (Top Frame)
  • 6 – 1×2 at 19 1/2″ (Cross Bars)
  • 6 – 1×3 at 25″ (Trim)
  • 20 – 1×3 at 3 3/4″ (Upper Side Paneling)
  • 40 – 1×3 at 21 1/4″ (Lower Side Paneling, Inside and Outside)
  • 20 – 1×3 at 19 1/2″ (Outside Top Paneling)
  • 10 – 1×3 at 31″ (Center Top Paneling)
  • 8 – 1×3 at 19 1/4″ (Drawer Faces for Bottom Drawers)
  • 6 – 1×4 at 23 1/4″ (Sides Upper Drawers)
  • 2 – 1×4 at 28 3/4″ (Front and Back Top Center Drawer)
  • 4 – 1×4 at 16 3/4″ (Front and Back Outside Top Drawers)
  • 6 – 1×4 at 19 1/4″ (Drawer Faces Top Outside, Middle Drawers
  • 1 – 1×4 at 30 3/4″ (Top Center Drawer Face)
  • 8 – 3/4″x3/4″ Square Trim at 19 1/4″ (Middle and Bottom Drawer Faces)
Instructions

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Step 1
Step 1

Build the Box: Use your Kreg to join your boards, at the 3/4 setting. Place a Pocket Hole approx. 2″ from the edges of your boards and then every 6″. I have shown placement for these on the left side of the image below. Where you have boards that are separate but directly above and below one another (the mint green and yellow green pieces seen below), stagger your Pocket Hole placement a tiny bit (1/4″) to ensure you don’t weaken your wood. When building this box, start at the bottom and work your way up for the ease of assembly. For the Shelves, your Pocket Hole placement will be on the bottom of the shelf on the outside edges.

Step 2
Step 2

Fasten the Backs to your box: Use the Kreg to attach the back to the Bottom Panels and the Main Panel at a 1/2″ setting. You should also use your 1″ Screws to fasten the Backs directly to the Dividers and side panels.

Step 3
Step 3
Step 3

Construct the Frame: Use your Kreg at a 3/4″ setting to attach the Cross Bars to the Legs, place your Pocket holes on the under side of the Cross Bars, 4 per Cross Bar should more than suffice (2 on each side of each Bar). Use the 1 1/2″ setting to join the frame pieces for the Top Frame. The Top and Bottom Frames are separate and not attached to each other.

Front and Back Bottom Frames, Front and Back Top Frames:

Step 4
Step 4

Fasten the Frames to the Box: Use your Kreg on the 3/4″ setting to fasten the Box to the Legs on the Front Side of the Box and on the Back Side of the Box you will actually fasten directly into the Legs using 1 1/2″ Screws, from the inside of the box through the Back Panels. Begin with the Lower Section. The Main Panel will sit directly on the top of the Bottom Frame/Legs, use 1 1/2″ Screws to fasten the Main Panel down into the Legs, be sure to countersink so that it remains flush. Then attach the top Frame to the Main Panel and the Dividers.

Step 5
Step 5

This is an ideal time to attach your drawer slides. Once you have done that, fasten the Box Top to the Box: Use 1 1/2″ Screws, be sure to countersink.

Step 6

Trim out your Desk: Use glue and 1 1/4″ Finish nails to fasten the trim and paneling in place. Miter the corner edges of your Upper side trim (yellow green pieces on the outside top of the desk) for the most professional appearance. if you aren’t able to do this, you can substitute a 1×2 for the lower 1×3 and fill the seam. **If you choose this option, you will need to add 1/4″ to the length of your side paneling on the outside upper side panels making them 4″ instead of 3 3/4″. The False Panels on the Back are 3/4″ Plywood. This isn’t required or necessary in any way, mainly decorative. If you will have the backside showing for your desk placement, you can add additional paneling on the back over the top of the Plywood just as you are doing for the sides and top.

Step 7
Step 7
Step 7
Step 7
Step 7
Step 7

Build your Drawers: Use your Kreg at the 1/2″ setting on all 4 sides of the drawer bottoms to fasten them to the Sides and Front/Back of each drawer. Also fasten the Front and Back to the Sides. You can see approximate Pocket Hole Placement in the X-Ray diagram below. You will place pocket holes approximately 2″ from the edges and every 6″ thereafter. The Front/ Back and Sides of the Top Drawers are constructed out of 1×4 Boards for ease of constructing. Not having to worry about cutting plywood perfectly square is always easier. The Middle and bottom Drawers are constructed out of 1/2″ Ply but could be constructed out of 1×8 and 1×12 boards if you don’t mind the perimeter being shorter than the drawer face, however you will need to decrease the size of the drawer bottoms by 1/2″ in either direction to accommodate this. This is an option you should consider if you have trouble cutting perfectly square pieces of ply.

X-Ray Pocket Hole Placement example, Outside Top Drawers, Top Center Drawer, Middle Drawers, Bottom Drawers:

Step 8

Fasten the Side Mount Drawer Slides to your Drawers and insert. Fill any Screw Holes and Finish as Desired. For a Faux Reclaimed or Weathered look if using new boards, see my Finishing School.

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

// Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you ONLY use 1 image and provide an ADEQUATE link back to the original source and appropriate plan! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential. By accessing or using any part of the web site, you agree to become bound by the terms and conditions of this website as outlined under Terms of Use. If you do not agree to all the terms and conditions of this agreement, then you may not access the Website or use any services. The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by The Design Confidential.com and while we endeavor to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, personal injury or death, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of information or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of this website. I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it. The Design Confidential.com is inspired by but does not replicate exact designs, any similarities between these plans and items sold at specialty retailers is coincidental and not endorsed by or related to any said retailers. // Affiliate links are used for tools and materials. The Design Confidential will earn a small commission for any items purchased using these links. Thank you for your support – every little bit counts!

Plans

Free Furniture Plans to Build a Restoration Hardware Inspired 10′ Provence Beam Dining Table

08.17.10
You Can Build This! Easy DIY Plans from The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build An Outdoor Provence Beam Dining Table via @thedesconf

This table is a beauty, and coming in at 120″ in length, should serve for most of your entertaining needs. Have I mentioned that this is extremely inexpensive as far as tables are concerned? Yep that’s right…coming in at under $75 in supplies (may vary by geography), I would say so…especially since the original sell for slightly under $4000!

Below are the other plans for variations of this table and plans for the benches!

Free DIY Furniture Plans to Build Provence Beam Benches

Free Furniture Plans to Build a Restoration Hardware Inspired Provence Beam Dining with 4×4’s

Free DIY Furniture Plans to Build an 8′ Provence Beam Dining Table

You Can Build This! Easy DIY Plans from The Design Confidential Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build An Outdoor Provence Beam Dining Table via @thedesconf

This collection is actually meant for outdoor use and has board spacing to accommodate water run off or potential weather issues that may arise. This would be equally as fabulous indoors, or perhaps even more fabulous because you could use it more frequently! This plan has been modified for ease of building and readily available materials and is in no way affiliated with the above mentioned specialty retailer.

As with all of our plans, you are building at your own risk and you should have a firm understanding of building in general before you attempt many of our plans (some are easy as pie and perfect for beginners). With that, go forth, have fun, take lots of pictures and share them in a showcase on the site or on social media with the hashtag #builtTDCtuff and we will share our faves! Be sure to tag @thedesignconfidential on Instagram / FB and @thedesconf on Twitter / Pinterest. If you are a blogger and you post about your build, don’t forget to include a link to your post on your showcase here. Don’t forget… for all of our newer plans, clicking on the images will let them expand to enormous sizes with much greater clarity. The older plans may need updating so please let us know if you need one fixed!

$50-$75

  • 4 – 2×10 at 10′
  • 13 – 2×4 at 10′
  • 4 – 2×10 at 120″ (Table Top)
  • 8 – 2×4 at 27 7/16″ (Legs)
  • 2 – 2×4 at 31 1/2″ (Top Supports)
  • 5 – 2×4 at 87 1/2″ (Table Braces and Upper Cross Beam)
  • 2 – 2×4 at 88″ (Bottom Cross Beams)
  • 4 – 2×4 at 23 5/8″ (Leg Stretchers)
  • 4 – 2×4 at 29 1/16″ (Table Trusses)

**The original uses large beams for the legs and supports. I have chosen to draw this plan using mainly 2×4’s for their ease of use, cost, and availability. When you are finished building, you can fill the seams between the boards and sand flush to give the appearance of larger beam construction.

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Build the Leg Bases: You will build 2 of these, exactly the same.

The Legs will be cut at a 10° Angle (off center) and depending on which direction you choose to ‘stack’ them will either be a miter or a bevel. The diagram for this step shows the legs stacked so that you would miter rather than bevel, but if you want to turn them, simply bevel instead! The outside toe of each leg will be lined up with the outside of the Top Supports. To secure you can either use your 3” screws to secure down through the Top Supports and into each leg or you can use your Kreg Jig and 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws to secure each leg to the top support. I would secure with 4 screws per leg in a square layout and at an angle if possible. Be sure to countersink so there isn’t an issue with the additional pieces in the table frame laying flat. Secure the Bottom Support using your Kreg Jig and 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws. You can choose to secure the outside piece first, with pocket holes facing inward, then the inside piece will cover those. When you secure the inside piece, simply place your pocket holes on the inside of the leg unit.

Create the Table Top: it will be comprised of 4 – 2×10’s spaced 1/2″ apart for proper water run off and outdoor use (not necessary for indoor use or dry climate – optional).

Fasten the Center Braces (Top and Bottom): Use your 5” lag screws or your 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws to secure your Bottom Brace to the Bottom Support and your 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws to fasten your Top Brace to your Top Support.

Cut and Fasten the Table Trusses. These will sit at a 45° Angle and will be cut at a 45° Angle .  Secure to the Top Center Brace using 3” wood screws in the same manner you secured the top Support in Step 1. Use 5” Lag screws or 2 1/2″ pocket hole screws to secure to the Bottom Cross Beams.

Build out the remainder of the Frame: Use your Kreg Jig on a 1 1/2″ stock setting and your 2 1/2” pocket hole screws and glue, and fasten the remaining 4 cross beams.

Attach your Table Top Boards: Use 2 1/2″ Wood Screws and secure from underneath and up through the Cross Beams and Top Supports

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

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