Plans

Free DIY Furniture Plans // How to Build a Toddler Cabin Bed

07.20.17

Make your toddler feel like the king of the wild with this DIY Furniture Plan to Build a Toddler Sized Cabin Bed. This Cabin features 4 lookout windows to keep an eye on all the wildlife, a comfortably pitched roof for lots of headroom and a small staircase just for fun! Build this and maybe your little one will sleep in for a change – or sleep in their own room all night long.

As with all of our plans, you are building at your own risk and you should have a firm understanding of building in general before you attempt many of our plans (some are easy as pie and perfect for beginners). With that, go forth, have fun, take lots of pictures and share them in a showcase on the site or on social media with the hashtag #builtTDCtuff and we will share our faves! Be sure to tag @thedesignconfidential on Instagram / FB and @thedesconf on Twitter / Pinterest. If you are a blogger and you post about your build, you can include a link to your post on your showcase here. Don’t forget… for all of our newer plans, clicking on the images will let them expand to enormous sizes with much greater clarity. The older plans may need updating so please let us know if you need one fixed!

$200-$250

  • 8 – 1/2×4 (rip down 1/2” plywood if lumber is unavailable) at 8’
  • 3 – 1×2 at 8’
  • 5 – 1×4 at 8’
  • 2 – 1×8 at 8’
  • 10 – 2×4 at 8’
  • 1 – 1/2” plywood at 4’x8’
  • 1 – 3/4” plywood at 4’x8’
  • 2 – 2×4 at 49-3/4” – Front Posts
  • 2 – 2×4 at 50-3/4” – Front Frame Top and Bottom
  • 1 – 2×4 at 27” – Front Door Frame
  • 1 – 2×4 at 27” – Front Window Base
  • 2 – 2×4 at 49-3/4” – Back Posts
  • 2 – 2×4 at 50-3/4” – Back Frame Top and Bottom
  • 1 – 2×4 at 50-3/4” – Back Window Base
  • 2 – 2×4 at 49-3/4” – Side Posts
  • 2 – 2×4 at 24” – Side Frame Top and Bottom
  • 1 – 2×4 at 24” – Side Window Base
  • 4 – 2×4 at 31” – Floor Joists
  • 4 – 2×4 at 15-7/16” – Rafters
  • 1 – 2×4 at 63-1/2” – Roof Ridge
  • 4 – 1×2 at 4-13/16” – Side Top Short Trim
  • 2 – 1×2 at 8-11/16” – Side Top Long Trim
  • 6 – 1×2 at 10-3/4” – Side Bottom Trim
  • 6 – 1×2 at 10-3/4” – Back Trim
  • 3 – 1×2 at 10-3/4” – Front Trim
  • 1 – 3/4” plywood at 31” x 54-3/4” – Floor
  • 1 – 1/2” plywood at 14-1/4” x 54-3/4” – Back Panel
  • 1 – 1/2” plywood at 14-1/4” x 32-1/2” – Front Panel
  • 2 – 1/2” plywood at 13-1/2” x 30” – Top Side Panel
  • 2 – 1/2” plywood at 14-1/4” x 30” – Bottom Side Panel
  • 1 – 1×4 at 27” – Front Ledge
  • 1 – 1×4 at 50-3/4” – Back Ledge
  • 2 – 1×4 at 24” – Side Ledges
  • 1 – 1×4 at 20-1/4” – Stair Hanger
  • 2 – 1×8 at 31-7/16” – Stair Sides
  • 2 – 1×8 at 18” – Steps
  • 4 – 1×4 at 63-1/2” – Purlins
  • 32 – 1/2×4 at 22” – Roof Slats

Before beginning to build, always check in on my site to make sure you have the most up to date set of plans, I occasionally update and change the plans to make the building process easier or to allow for less expensive purchasing of materials! Read through the entire set of instructions and all comments before beginning this project. If you print out or save plans, be sure to check in on my site to be sure you have the most up to date set of plans, as I occasionally update things for ease of building or buying. If you are new to building, read through the GETTING STARTED section and other articles found under the BUILD tab in the menu on my site, it has valuable information about how to get started, tools and techniques. If you are unfamiliar with the finishing process, visit my Finishing school for some tips and tricks for painting like a pro and for special finishing practices. Use glue to secure your joints and Consider Painting or Staining individual sections prior to assembling. This makes the paint application virtually flawless. Coat with a spray on Poly or Wipe on Poly to protect your finish and your piece and it will last for ages. Adhere to all safety standards and guidelines, and be sure you follow safety protocol throughout your build. If you are unsure about whether you are building safely, run a quick online search for the tool or technique you are using, or contact me via email or post to the forum before you move ahead. My contact info can be found in the menu of my site.

Cut the pieces for the Front Posts, Front Frame Top and Bottom, Front Door Frame, and Front Window Base as shown. With the Kreg jig for 1-1/2” material, drill pocket holes in each end of the Front Frame Top and Bottom, Front Door Frame, and Front Window Base. Assemble as shown with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws.

Cut the pieces for the Back Posts, Back Frame Top and Bottom, and Back Window Base as shown. With the Kreg jig for 1-1/2” material, drill pocket holes in each end of the Back Frame Top and Bottom and Back Window Base. Assemble as shown with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws.

Cut the pieces for the Side Posts, Side Frame Top and Bottom, and Side Window Frame as shown. With the Kreg jig for 1-1/2” material, drill pocket holes in each end of the Side Frame Top and Bottom and Side Window Base. Additionally, drill pocket holes along the long side of the Side Posts (to later attach to the Front and Back Posts). Assemble as shown with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws. Repeat this step twice, once for each side.

Assemble Side Frames to the Front and Back Frames as shown with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws. Repeat this step twice, once for each side.

Cut the pieces for the Floor Joists. With the Kreg jig for 1-1/2” material, drill pocket holes in each end of the Floor Joists. Assemble as shown with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws.

Cut the pieces for the Rafters. With the Kreg jig for 1-1/2” material, drill pocket holes in both ends of one Rafter and on the non Ridge notch end of the second Rafter (see image of Rafters assembled in place) – avoid drilling pocket screws in the Ridge notch area.

Assemble as shown with glue and 2-1/2” pocket screws.

Cut the piece for the Roof Ridge. Attach as shown with glue and 1-1/4” brad nails, nailed through the Rafters.

Cut the pieces for the Side Top Short and Long Trim and for the Side Bottom Trim. With the Kreg jig for 3/4” material, drill pocket holes in each end of the Trim pieces. Assemble as shown with glue and 1-1/4” pocket screws. Repeat this step twice, once for each side.

Cut the pieces for the Back Trim. With the Kreg jig for 3/4” material, drill pocket holes in each end of the Trim pieces. Assemble as shown with glue and 1-1/4” pocket screws.

Cut the pieces for the Front Trim. With the Kreg jig for 3/4” material, drill pocket holes in each end of the Trim pieces. Assemble as shown with glue and 1-1/4” pocket screws.

Cut the piece for the Floor. Assemble as shown with glue and 1-1/4” brad nails.

Cut the piece for the Back Panel. Assemble as shown with glue and 1-1/4” brad nails to secure all sides.

Cut the piece for the Front Panel. Assemble as shown with glue and 1-1/4” brad nails to secure all sides.

Cut the pieces for the Top Side Panel and Bottom Side Panel. Assemble as shown with the bottom of the Top Side Panel flush with the bottom of the Side Frame Top and the top of the Bottom Side Panel flush with the top of the Side Window Frame. Assemble with glue and 1-1/4” brad nails. Repeat this step twice, once for each side.

Cut the pieces for the Front and Back Ledges. Position the Ledges so that the inside edges are flush with the inside edge of the plywood Panels. Attach as shown with glue and 1-1/4” brad nails.

Cut the pieces for the Side Ledges. Position the Ledges so that the inside edges are flush with the inside edge of the plywood Panels. Attach as shown with glue and 1-1/4” brad nails.


Cut the piece for the Stair Hanger. With the Kreg jig for 3/4” material, drill pocket holes in each end of the Stair Hanger. Assemble as shown with glue and 1-1/4” pocket screws.


Cut the pieces for the Stair Sides and Steps.

With the Kreg jig for 3/4” material, drill pocket holes in each end of the Steps. Assemble as shown with glue and 1-1/4” pocket screws – make sure the pocket holes face the ground when assembling. Place on the Stair Hanger as shown.


Cut the pieces for the Purlins. Attach as shown with glue and 1-1/4” brad nails.

Cut the pieces for the Roof Slats. Attach as shown with glue and 1-1/4” brad nails. Roof Slats should be spaced 1/2” apart from each other. The first and last Roof Slats should be flush with the edge of the Roof Ridge.With your cabin bed built, it wouldn’t hurt to throw on an anti-tip kit for good measure. Just in case it is your kiddo who is the wild animal – like mine – or the worst case scenario tends to happen to you. Better safe than sorry – always!

Fill any Screw, Nail or Pocket Holes, Sand and Finish as Desired. For Finishing Tips and Tricks visit my Finishing School

// Disclaimer: Some rights reserved. Private use only. Feel Free to link to any of my plans so long as you ONLY use 1 image and provide an ADEQUATE link back to the original source and appropriate plan! Plans from this page are not to be used for commercial purposes or republished without the express written consent of Rayan Turner, The Design Confidential. By accessing or using any part of the web site, you agree to become bound by the terms and conditions of this website as outlined under Terms of Use. If you do not agree to all the terms and conditions of this agreement, then you may not access the Website or use any services. The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. The information is provided by The Design Confidential.com and while we endeavor to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk. In no event will we be liable for any loss or damage including without limitation, indirect or consequential loss or damage, personal injury or death, or any loss or damage whatsoever arising from loss of information or profits arising out of, or in connection with, the use of this website. I hope to provide accurate plans, however, I cannot guarantee each plan for accuracy. Not every plan that I post has been built and tested, so you are building at your own risk. It is recommended that you have a clear understanding of how the project works before beginning any project. Please contact me if you find an error or inaccuracy so that I might fix it. The Design Confidential.com is inspired by but does not replicate exact designs, any similarities between these plans and items sold at specialty retailers is coincidental and not endorsed by or related to any said retailers. // Affiliate links are used for tools and materials. The Design Confidential will earn a small commission for any items purchased using these links. Thank you for your support – every little bit counts!
Showcase

Reader Showcase // Erin’s Provence Beam Dining

07.18.17
This gorgeous builder’s showcase is giving off some serious backyard dinner party vibes, don’t you think? I think the color they chose might be up there on my list of faves for this particular piece, and all outdoor furniture for that matter. There is something to be said for crisp and clean… You can head on over to Erin’s blog and get the low down on how this build came together, the link is down below!
To Read More About This Build, Visit This Blog Post

A few afternoons

Raised the height to accommodate the chair arms.

Paint – lovely, lovely paint!

Home / Studio

When the Going Gets Tough, the Tough Hide Out in the Dark

07.13.17

The Design Confidential x Lennox Collab / Cool Home Tech Updates via @thedesconf

This post was brought to you by Lennox. Innovation never felt so good. ​Contact your local Lennox dealer today to learn more about the precise and efficient HVAC products Lennox offers.

Two weeks ago it rained and temps were hovering in the mid-sixties, which in this neck of the woods typically means no one goes outside to play. No less than seven days later, the temperatures are well over a hundred and far too hot to go outside for any reason at all. In Northern California, temperatures above the one hundred mark are a standard occurrence, from June till August. While the climate here is anything but humid, it is just humid enough, that no amount of shade makes it bearable to sit outside, at least not by choice.

The Design Confidential x Lennox Collab / Cool Home Tech Updates via @thedesconf

Our home was built in 2005 and while it is not old, it is certainly not new enough to benefit from many of the energy efficient standards they have put into practice over the last few years. In fact, I might wager to guess that if we had an energy audit done, we would easily be no higher than a rating in the sixtieth percentile for energy efficiency, and this would not be for a lack of energy efficient building materials and appliances. Our poor rating would far more likely be due to the insane amount of energy loss that occurs throughout our home, thanks to a handful of details that have been overlooked and have taken a turn for the worse over time. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the second-floor bedroom my boys share.  Let me show you what I mean…

The Design Confidential x Lennox Collab / Cool Home Tech Updates via @thedesconf

Above is a very rough and general floor plan that shows how my home lays out, the direction the rooms face and the location of my existing thermostats. One of the greatest difficulties we deal with each summer is in trying to cool the southern facing rooms. This is made worse by the fact that our upstairs thermostat is on the opposite side of the house, facing north, and the first floor thermostat is in the only space in this entire house that does not have eight thousand windows, magnifying the heat and cooking us from the inside, out.  It only makes matters worse that the southern facing rooms are separated from the rest of the house by no less than eight million miles of hallway and more windows than any person should have to deal with, without having an unlimited budget to counteract the energy loss that happens consequently.

The boys currently share bedroom 3 on the second floor, which is the southernmost facing room in the house. There is not much in the way of shelter from the 100 plus degree sun that beats down on that side of our home, from morning till night. Even with twice the amount of window coverings in this space, there is no lack of light and heat to raise the indoor temperatures up into the nineties in the blink of an eye. To cool their room down to a slightly tolerable temperature, I have to turn the air conditioning down to near below freezing temps in the master bedroom. It creates a misery of overwhelming proportions and can cost upwards of $600 per month in the warmest months of the year. To pay such a high price only to suffer both extremes, hardly seems fair.

The Design Confidential x Lennox Collab / Cool Home Tech Updates via @thedesconf

I currently have a complex system in place for opening and closing the blinds, depending on the time of day and whether I am trying to let in light, shield from the heat or usher in the cooler temps once the sun has set for the night. While this frequently feels futile, every little bit truly helps and I am perfectly willing to commit this act of futility and hide out in the dark, if it means we can eek out a few more good years before we need to replace our entire HVAC system, outright. Given the sprawl of our home’s footprint, when the system goes, it will be nothing short of a small fortune to replace it and address those areas where the energy loss is greatest, or we risk winding up in a similar scenario in the future. Likely, the replacement cost of a new hi-tech unit that is more functional for our home and the extreme climate we have here, will be the least of the costs as the windows, inadequate insulation and miles upon miles of ducting, are also likely culprits of increased heat in the summer time. The total cost of the updates that need to take place to make this home run efficiently and comfortably will absolutely be several tens of thousands of dollars, but in the meantime, I think there must be some more affordable upgrades I might do to better the functionality of our units and lower the cost of our utility bill each month.

The easiest upgrade of all is also the least costly and that is to install fans in those bedrooms that are currently lacking in the cool air department. This is an update I have planned for the guest bedroom, shortly, but for the boy’s room this is not an option. Their bunk bed limits what I can put on the ceiling and the size of their room is just too small to place two beds and still have room for toys or anything else.

The Design Confidential x Lennox Collab / Cool Home Tech Updates via @thedesconf

When Lennox reached out about their new iComfort® S30 thermostat, it got me thinking about how this might be helpful to someone who doesn’t happen to have one of their amazing heating and cooling units. What I found when I started digging around, was exciting given my current plight. It turns out Lennox is a maker of home heating and cooling systems with excellent ratings and reviews all around. In addition to heating and cooling units, they also have several air purification systems and a zoning system that I am seriously looking into. It will let you create up to four separate zones for heating and cooling your home.  This means that when one zone needs to be cooled, while another does not, energy is not wasted through collateral cooling or heating, where it isn’t needed. Essentially, I will not freeze while my boys are roasting. When paired with their new iComfort® S30 thermostat, this stands to be a fantastic solution for making the whole home completely comfortable and potentially lower your bills while you are at it.

It sounds like it works through a series of dampers placed in the ducting, that act to open or close the airway depending on your needs. This seems like it would increase the efficiency of my system, making it a life well spent in the process. I know the benefits of a new hi-tech unit, but I wasn’t expecting to find something that would help my unit become a bit more hi-tech without having to replace it outright. This seems like a fantastic investment, regardless of the unit you may or may not have. If I could split my home into four separate zones, it seems as though it would provide a customizable solution for my heating and cooling issues. From there, the iComfort® S30 would allow me to control the various zones via an app (this obviously means, from the comfort of my bed), and I would live on as the happiest camper of all.

Do you all struggle with this issue as well? Or maybe you have the opposite problem? What are your summertime solutions to beat the heat? 

This post was brought to you by Lennox. Innovation never felt so good.

Build / DIY

Finishing School // DIY Stained Glass + All Weather Wood With Leather

07.09.17

The Design Confidential x Michaels Makers Craft Paint Challenge DIY Stained Glass and All-Weather Wood with Leather via @thedesconf

Finishing School is in session, my friends… and today we are covering some new finishes that are perfect to add to your finishing arsenal – stained glass, all-weather wood and even some leather. The fabulous thing about the main finish is that it will work on raw wood – or in other words – newly built furniture, if you catch my drift. If you want to dress up your glass inserts, I will show you a fantastic way to do it.

The Design Confidential x Michaels Makers Craft Paint Challenge DIY Stained Glass and All-Weather Wood with Leather via @thedesconf

This month’s Michaels Makers Challenge is all about the world of craft paint. I thought it would be a great opportunity to give some of the ideas I have had, floating around in my little head, a bit of a whirl. I am working with the super chic vintage bar cart from Oh Joy for Target, which is sadly not available any longer, but this one is a great option if you would like to put your unique spin an existing piece. Of course you can choose to build something from the ground up, as well, using any of my DIY furniture plans!

The Design Confidential x Michaels Makers Craft Paint Challenge DIY Stained Glass and All-Weather Wood with Leather via @thedesconf

As you can see, this bar cart is fantastic as-is, but a bit too colorful to work with my decor on a more permanent basis. Of course it has a lot of little challenges in the rehab department, with two different shades of glass for the trays, solidly painted wood and even a bit of faux leather on the handle(bar?). I was able to reign it in and neutralize the color with just a few products, making this a simple and budget friendly revamp. Note that both glass trays appear fairly light in the image above, but they are not. Both colors were relatively saturated and about mid-range in terms of light and dark. You can see this more accurately for the yellow tray, in the image below.

MATERIALS //

The Design Confidential x Michaels Makers Craft Paint Challenge DIY Stained Glass and All-Weather Wood with Leather via @thedesconf

For those of you who have ever taken any classes on color theory, you are probably aware that the best way to make a neutral color is to blend the three primary colors of red, yellow and blue. So if you are working with clear glass, you will want to purchase all three colors of stained glass spray paint and you can choose the dark blue or the light blue depending on how dark or light you prefer your neutral to be. If you are attempting to alter an existing color and want to neutralize it, and you are working with a color that is a secondary color (orange, green or purple), you will simply choose the complimentary color on the color wheel (the color directly opposite from your color – blue, red or yellow).

The Design Confidential x Michaels Makers Craft Paint Challenge DIY Stained Glass and All-Weather Wood with Leather via @thedesconf

If your existing tint is a tertiary color, you will do the same as you will for the secondary colors by choosing a complimentary color – but, since you do not have the option of lime green or crimson stained glass spray paint colors to work with, you will choose both of the complimentary colors on either side of your actual complimentary color. For example, if your glass is tinted a shade of pink similar to the crimson section, instead of choosing lime green as your complimentary color you will choose both green and yellow. If your existing tint is red-orange, you will choose green and blue to neutralize.

Since I am starting with one dark reddish pink tinted glass tray and one yellow, I simply need to focus on completing the trifecta for each, in the hopes of bringing them closer in shade and hue. For the yellow tray I will use the dark blue and red stained glass spray paint, and for the dark pink I will use the lighter blue and the yellow. It is important to note that you will NOT apply these color equally. Since blue and red are more dominant colors, you will always use less of those, regardless of your starting point.

The Design Confidential x Michaels Makers Craft Paint Challenge DIY Stained Glass and All-Weather Wood with Leather via @thedesconf

If you occasionally lose your mind, like I do, and you buy the yellow sea glass paint instead of the yellow stained glass paint… you can either go with the frosted look, or you can take the complementary color route as described above, just be warned it is much more difficult to do this if your complimentary color calls for green. The green color option is a very standard green color which means it is a relatively equal mix of yellow and blue – which is precisely what I mentioned you would NOT want to do in the previous paragraph. So yes, not having yellow at your disposal will likely make things tricky.

When I tried to replace the sea glass for the correct product, they were out of stock, so I thought I would roll with it and see just how difficult it would be. Naturally, if I was taking that hard route for the reddish pink tray I figured I would do the same for the yellow and use the purple stained glass for it, rather than the red and dark blue.

If you are using the primary colors to neutralize, start with the more dominant color and you will be spraying the bottom side of your glass. I always like to get a running start with spray paint, to work the crazy out, and then I will over spray on the sides in each direction, as I move back and forth with my paint. You will spray one very light coat of your more dominant color, running horizontally across your glass, over spraying on the sides (so you do not end up with stop and start marks) and overlapping slightly with each subsequent spray. Wait a couple of minutes and then spray one additional extremely light coat of the dominant color, in the opposite direction, or vertically. Let this dry for a few minutes and then get to work on your lighter color. You will apply this in the same way, alternating between a horizontal and vertical direction, for each coat of paint. You will have to use your best judgement as to how many layers of this second color you need, but it will likely be somewhere between six and fifteen, depending on whether it is yellow or red. Yellow will obviously require more layers than red.

The Design Confidential x Michaels Makers Craft Paint Challenge DIY Stained Glass and All-Weather Wood with Leather via @thedesconf

If you need to use a secondary color as I did here, I am happy to report that after 87 very light coats in both directions, I was successful in evening them out and neutralizing them quite a bit. They are not perfect, by any means, especially when you consider my lack of patience and the colors I was working with. But, they are both far more even in lightness to darkness and much more bronze in color. Sadly, I didn’t think to take a before shot of the trays next to each other as you see them above. That would give you a much better understanding of just how far they came and how similar they are now in comparison.

The Design Confidential x Michaels Makers Craft Paint Challenge DIY Stained Glass and All-Weather Wood with Leather via @thedesconf

I let the trays fully cure over night and the next day I painted the wood surround with the outdoor paint. I used a 1 inch foam brush and it was as easy as can be. No sanding or priming was necessary even though I was working with an existing finish – gotta love that – and it went on like butter. I applied two thorough coats of paint and that is it. No sealant is necessary and given the nature of this piece of furniture, having a water resistant, durable paint seemed like the way to go. This will make maintenance virtually nil. I also love that…

As for the faux leather wrap on the handlebar, I used the same paint and foam brush, making sure to apply the paint to all areas of the texture. I applied two coats mainly to be sure I had every nook and cranny covered and it worked beautifully.

The Design Confidential x Michaels Makers Craft Paint Challenge DIY Stained Glass and All-Weather Wood with Leather via @thedesconf

The reflective quality of the leather made it difficult to capture, but I was pleasantly surprised at how well this paint worked on this type of material. It looks as if it was black all along and in no way appears to be painted. It feels fantastic as well, without having any of that painted feel. It is quite remarkable and begs for some additional testing, to see just how far one might take this… but for now, suffice to say that I am surprisingly really happy with every aspect of this makeover. I feel like both types of paint used here have a lot of potential and open a lot of finishing school doors along the road to more complicated and intricate DIY projects. You know how I like options… options is precisely what this project gave me.

The Design Confidential x Michaels Makers Craft Paint Challenge DIY Stained Glass and All-Weather Wood with Leather via @thedesconf

This project was created for The Design Confidential, in partnership with Michaels and my role as a Michaels Maker.  With over 800 new styles of craft paint, Michaels has more paints for more surfaces! Check out some of their new finishes including ultra-metallic & watercolor and get started on your next DIY! If you want to see how the other amazing crafty folks used craft paint for their challenge projects this month, visit the Michaels’ blog, The Glue String, or browse the goodness below.

Design / DIY / Home / Shopping / Studio

From the Windows to the Walls / Upping the Ante on Curb Appeal

06.27.17

The Design Confidential x Schlage Curb Appeal Update via @thedesconf

Curb appeal… that tricky little concept that can be somewhat elusive and difficult to nail down. The very definition of curb appeal is entirely subjective, but when things have spiraled out of control, your neighbors are usually irritated at the sincere lack of appeal your home gives off, in unison.

From the windows to the walls, curb appeal involves absolutely everything you can see from the curb. That is quite a bit of real estate to consider when you are trying to up the ante and show off a bit of your personal style without straying too far from the confines of your neighborhood’s existing style. Because being the odd man out on the block, is not usually a good thing…

The Design Confidential x Schlage Curb Appeal Update via @thedesconf

Take for example the view from the front of my house… Not crazy awful, at first glance, and certainly not ruffling any feathers around these parts. Of course on closer inspection, you may notice a few things that make you cringe and might even look familiar if you are a procrastinator of small repairs, like I am. Truthfully, I lived with my front porch in this state for so long, the things that needed to be done out there managed to transition from nagging little tasks, to utterly invisible problem areas, without so much as a peep.

The two empty pots you see flanking the decorative railing are filled with soil, the memory of two adorable trees that are no more and a reminder to all those who dare to tread there, death comes quickly in the form of extreme heat and a lack of attention. I am fairly certain I used them for planting a couple of faux tombstones, last Halloween, so it is safe to assume the loss of my trees was not a recent occurrence.

The Design Confidential x Schlage Curb Appeal Update via @thedesconf

A couple of years ago I installed a Sense Smart Deadbolt with Century Trim and matching handleset and as you can see, I never got around to touching up the paint from the previous door hardware. In my pitiful defense, I live in a neighborhood with fairly rigid HOA regulations, and we are not able to alter the exterior colors without going through design review. I was left several of the paint colors used throughout, when we moved in, but not one for the exterior door and trim. This meant I would need to color match in order to touch up, or go through the process of design review, and that was not entirely conducive to maintaining my motivation to fix the problem – as you can see… Apparently obstacles are my nemesis.

The Design Confidential x Schlage Curb Appeal Update via @thedesconf

Aside from the row of lilies I planted last year, to say my curb appeal was sincerely lacking, would be the understatement of the year. Since no one was storming the house with pitchforks or torches, I managed to wear blinders for the better part of two years until I had finally had enough of the madness.

The Design Confidential x Schlage Curb Appeal Update via @thedesconf

Schlage Sense Smart Deadbolt with Century Trim and Latitude Lever Set / Paint / Trees / Bench / Pots and Similar Option / Rug / Lanterns / Wood Table / Solar Landscape Lighting / Doormat

Armed with a far more pulled together overall plan for the interior spaces, I crafted a design plan for the exterior. I drew my inspiration from the interior details and while the furnishings may change, the finishes create continuity and flow between the inside and out. Starting with a desperately needed fresh coat of paint on the front door and gorgeous new hardware that is same-same, only different (in the finish), I began checking things off my very long list of exterior updates to help improve my previously sad state of affairs out here.

The Design Confidential x Schlage Curb Appeal Update via @thedesconf

I gave the concrete a good scrubbing and it improved the appearance substantially. It will need to be resurfaced at some point, but it is far more civilized with a proper bathing. The gorgeous smokebush trees are show stopping, to be sure, but nothing makes as much impact on the overall curb appeal of this space as the new door hardware I installed in matte black. I adored the previous iteration of this set, but by introducing a new finish into the space, it was out of place so replacing it with the matte black version works so much better and ties in the existing door hardware elements.

The Design Confidential x Schlage Curb Appeal Update via @thedesconf

While the majority of the people who grace my front porch and enter through my door are under the age of ten, I feel confident that the changes I made out here more accurately represent the type of home I have and want to portray.

It is important to me to have beautiful finishes and fixtures throughout my spaces, but I demand those pieces I choose work hard and require very little from me in return, especially as it relates to installation, maintenance and upkeep. My previous door hardware did precisely that, so much so that I was willing to overlook the crazy paint job that remained, but this new colorway knocks it out of the park. What’s more is the fact that the most difficult aspect of overhauling this space was driving all over town for an entire week to find just the right trees. The new handleset and deadbolt took less than ten minutes to put in place, even with my husband out of town and pack of wild children coming and going like bees in a hive, and all it required from me was nothing more than an hour of my time to repaint the door, so that gorgeous hardware would sit pretty, as it rightfully should.

The Design Confidential x Schlage Curb Appeal Update via @thedesconf

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This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Schlage. The opinions and text are all mine.